Crime

Here’s why trial is delayed for Mississippi lawmaker accused of punching his wife

Mississippi lawmaker accused of drunkenly punching wife has trial set

Mississippi Rep. Douglas Mcleod is set to go trial on misdemeanor domestic violence charge in George County Justice Court after he allegedly drunkenly punched his wife in the face, bloodying her nose.
Up Next
Mississippi Rep. Douglas Mcleod is set to go trial on misdemeanor domestic violence charge in George County Justice Court after he allegedly drunkenly punched his wife in the face, bloodying her nose.

The domestic violence trial of state Rep. Douglas McLeod has been reset to Aug. 20 after George County Prosecutor Joey Griffin recused himself.

McLeod was initially set to go trial July 9, but after Griffin recused himself due to a conflict of interest, District Attorney Angel Myers McIlrath said her office would take over the prosecution.

The District Attorney’s Office had a conflict with the July trial date and asked that it be moved to August to give state prosecutors time to talk to witnesses and prepare for trial.

Judge Mike Bullock approved the continuance.

The Republican lawmaker was arrested after George County deputies responded to a May 18 report of a domestic incident inside McLeod’s home on Bexley Church Road.

A deputy said the lawmaker’s wife, Michele McLeod, “advised she was hit in the face by her husband,” and had a “bloody face and nose at the scene.”

McLeod was arrested on a charge of domestic violence by simple assault.

According to the report, a woman staying in an upstairs room the night of the alleged assault told deputies Mcleod was “freaking drunk” and “wanted sex from Mrs. McLeod.”

Deputies found blood on the couple’s bed and on the floor next to the bed. They also found items on the floor that had been on a dresser in the bedroom.

McLeod was taken into custody at his home and released on bond.

In the aftermath of the arrest, state lawmakers called for McLeod’s resignation.

McLeod and his wife later issued a joint statement in which the couple said there had been “many fabrications and misrepresentations” in the media and on social media about what had happened.

In response, the Sun Herald published a police report on the incident.

If convicted, McLeod is facing up to a $500 fine or up to six months in a county jail or both.

Margaret Baker is an investigative reporter whose search for truth exposed corrupt sheriffs, a police chief and various jailers and led to the first prosecution of a federal hate crime for the murder of a transgendered person. She worked on the Sun Herald’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Hurricane Katrina team. When she pursues a big story, she is relentless.
  Comments