Harrison County

FBI training for police officers helps make D’Iberville safer, chief says

Capt. Marty Griffin, a criminal investigator with the D’Iberville Police Department, recently graduated from the FBI National Academy in Virginia.
Capt. Marty Griffin, a criminal investigator with the D’Iberville Police Department, recently graduated from the FBI National Academy in Virginia.

The 11 weeks Capt. Marty Griffin spent away from his job as an investigator with the D’Iberville Police Department, while attending the 270th session of the FBI National Academy at Quantico, Virginia, will make the city safer, said Police Chief Wayne Payne.

“You’ll have classmates from all over the world,” Payne said, and the connections Griffin made will allow him to pick up the phone and get information and help from the people he knows in other departments.

The 222 graduates came from 49 states, 20 countries, three military organizations and four federal organizations. About 1 percent of law enforcement managers are selected to attend and Griffin was one of two people from Mississippi.

President Donald Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, FBI Director Christopher Wray and Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe attended the graduation ceremony on Dec. 15.

Payne attended the course in 1986, and sent former members of the D’Iberville Police Department Keith Davis and Tim Hendricks through the FBI Academy. Davis went on to become police chief in Moss Point and now is the chief of marine patrol for the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources. Hendricks is police chief in Pass Christian.

“Marty’s not going anywhere,” Payne jokes.

Griffin and his classmates learned about terrorism and terrorist mindsets, something that seems far away from D’Iberville, but can happen anywhere. Other courses in intelligence theory, law, behavioral science, communication and forensic science were designed to raise law enforcement standards, knowledge and cooperation worldwide, according to a press release.

D’Iberville Police Department has a staff of 41, and Payne has sought grants and special training for his department. Two officers are assigned to the Retail Crimes Unit. It is funded through a grant and Payne said it has proven to be very successful in the major shopping areas in the city. Another officer is assigned to Drug Enforcement Agency Task Force, one to the Coastal Narcotics Team and one with ICE, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, to work within the city limits.

“Anytime you can network with other law enforcement agencies, it aids us in fighting crime and protecting our citizens,” Payne said.

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