John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, at his office at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Miss., May 4, 2017. In his new book “The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South,” Edge writes of his struggle to reconcile his “profound love of the South with the deep anger that boiled in me when I confronted our peculiar history.”
John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, at his office at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Miss., May 4, 2017. In his new book “The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South,” Edge writes of his struggle to reconcile his “profound love of the South with the deep anger that boiled in me when I confronted our peculiar history.” ANDREA MORALES The New York Times
John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, at his office at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Miss., May 4, 2017. In his new book “The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South,” Edge writes of his struggle to reconcile his “profound love of the South with the deep anger that boiled in me when I confronted our peculiar history.” ANDREA MORALES The New York Times

A powerful, and provocative, voice for Southern food

May 23, 2017 03:13 PM

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