Ole Miss

Ole Miss promised to appeal the NCAA’s additional sanctions. Now it’s following through.

Ole Miss chancellor Jeff Vitter, left, speaks as athletic director Ross Bjork listens as the discuss NCAA sanctions leveled against the football program during a press conference at the Manning Center in Oxford, Miss., Friday, Dec. 1, 2017. The program was handed a two-year postseason ban and other penalties by the NCAA.
Ole Miss chancellor Jeff Vitter, left, speaks as athletic director Ross Bjork listens as the discuss NCAA sanctions leveled against the football program during a press conference at the Manning Center in Oxford, Miss., Friday, Dec. 1, 2017. The program was handed a two-year postseason ban and other penalties by the NCAA. AP

The Ole Miss-NCAA saga isn’t over just yet. When the NCAA released its sanctions Dec. 1 against the school’s football program, Ole Miss took issue with several components of their punishment and promised to appeal.

On Friday, they made it official.

In a press release, the university announced it’s submitting a written “notice of its intent to appeal the Public Infractions Decision Letter of the NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions.”

Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter was particularly upset about the school’s second bowl ban, which allowed rising seniors to transfer.

Ole Miss had already self-imposed a bowl ban for 2017. The COI also upheld the school’s self-imposed reduction of 13 scholarships.

Legal changes

The school also announced it has retained Mississippi-based law firm Butler Snow — in addition to Don Barrett of the Barrett Law Group — to join its existing legal team of Lightfoot, Franklin & White and Bond, Schoeneck & King for NCAA-related matters.

“We have the best legal team in the country to handle our NCAA appeal. We added Mississippi-based firms to further strengthen an already exceptional team so that we are in the best possible position to win this appeal,” Vitter said in the release. “We believe the additional penalties imposed by the COI are unwarranted, which we will make very clear at the appropriate time in our written submissions on the merits of our appeal.”

RebelGrove.com’s Chase Parham reported Monday that Ole Miss’ general counsel, Lee Tyner, was resigning and that Perry Sansing will serve in the same capacity on an interim basis.

Patrick Ochs: 228-896-2321, @PatrickOchs

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