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This Coast nursing home is one of 400 to ‘persistently fall short’ of Medicare standards

Selecting a nursing home. Loved ones ‘have to monitor care on a daily basis.’

Sherry Culp, executive director of the Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass, describes about how to select a nursing home for a loved one. Brookdale Senior Living resident Becky Walters talks about life in her nursing home.
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Sherry Culp, executive director of the Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass, describes about how to select a nursing home for a loved one. Brookdale Senior Living resident Becky Walters talks about life in her nursing home.

A Diamondhead nursing home is one of six in the state and more than 400 across the country on a federal list of facilities that “persistently fall short” of federal standards.

Two U.S. senators from Pennsylvania, Republican Pat Toomey and Democrat Bob Casey, released the list of problematic nursing homes last week after a years-long newspaper investigation by PennLive.com/The Patriot-News brought the issue to light.

Each nursing home on the list qualifies for a federal program called Special Focus Facility, which provides increased scrutiny of homes with a history of quality issues and that “substantially fail” to meet Medicare and Medicaid standards.

The report says a lack of funding means the increased scrutiny can only be applied to a fraction of problematic facilities, a maximum of 88 nationwide. Only those 88 are made public, so Toomey and Casey requested and made public the list of 435 candidate facilities.

Woodland Village Nursing Center in Diamondhead is listed as a candidate for the SFF program. The Medicare.gov website, the facility has a one-star rating of Much Below Average. It has one star for both health inspection rating and quality measures rating, and two stars (Below Average) for staffing rating.

Recently, Woodland Village has had two federal fines totaling $16,559 and one payment denial by Medicare after a February 2018 annual inspection listed 16 deficiencies, four of which could have placed residents in “immediate jeopardy.”

The four worst deficiencies were for the following standards:

  • Provide care by qualified persons according to each resident’s written plan of care.
  • Provide safe and appropriate respiratory care for a resident when needed.
  • Provide enough nursing staff every day to meet the needs of every resident; and have a licensed nurse in charge on each shift.
  • Conduct and document a facility-wide assessment to determine what resources are necessary to care for residents competently during both day-to-day operations and emergencies.

The Mississippi State Department of Health has records of seven investigations since 2014 that were prompted by complaints, but all the investigations found the claims to be unsubstantiated.

When contacted by phone, Woodland Village declined to comment for this story. The nursing home’s website also lists Stone County Nursing & Rehabilitation Center and Leakesville Rehabilitation & Nursing Center as affiliated facilities. Those were not on the SFF candidate list.

Also on the list in Mississippi are: Diversicare of Southaven, MS Care Center of Greenville, Aurora Health and Rehabilitation in Columbus, Walter B. Crook Nursing Facility in Sunflower County, and Meridian Community Living Center.

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