Business

Facebook knows more about you than you think, lots more — even after you’ve logged out

Facebook has squeezed just about as many ads into its main platform as it can. Any more and users might start to complain. Now, ads are moving on to Messenger, and WhatsApp may not be too far behind.
Facebook has squeezed just about as many ads into its main platform as it can. Any more and users might start to complain. Now, ads are moving on to Messenger, and WhatsApp may not be too far behind. AP

Good old Facebook. With more than two billion users, the social media platform has become a huge part of how we communicate. It’s a great way to share photos of your family, keep up with people with whom you went to high school and receive news and information. But the social media Goliath may know more about you than you think — even after you’ve logged out.

TNW (thenextweb.com) reports Facebook not only knows what type of music or movies you prefer based on the pages you “like,” but also your primary way of connecting, be it smart phone or computer, which browser your prefer and even the speed of your connection.

Remember that post your friend made about whatever political thing and you hit the “like” button? Yes. Facebook even keeps up with your political meanderings to sort you into various categories of liberals and conservatives.

And the information is gathered and stored with one thing in mind, which is to sell you products — lots and lots of products.

You can see a snapshot of how Facebook is sorting your life into advertising piles here. You must be logged into Facebook to see this.

But certainly the madness is over once you’ve logged out of Facebook, right? Well, not exactly.

Fortune.com reports that a decision made earlier in July by U.S. District Judge Edward Davila in San Jose, California, allows Facebook to track your internet activity even after you’ve logged out.

According to USA Today, the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which was filed more than five years ago, claim the tracking by Facebook is "the single most pervasive and grave threat to data privacy today."

Davila's decision prevents the plaintiffs from amending and re-filing the privacy and wiretapping allegations but allows them to pursue a breach of contract claim, said the USA TODAY report.

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