Outdoors

Outdoors

Mississippi announces Early Migratory Bird Seasons for next year

The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks recently announced the 2016-2017 early hunting seasons for migratory game birds. The early seasons are for resident Canada geese, early teal, snipe, woodcock, dove, and rails. Mourning dove season will open statewide on Sept. 3 at noon for a 90-day, 15-bird daily bag limit. The possession limit is 45 birds. MDWFP Waterfowl Program leader Houston Havens said no changes were made to early season migratory game bird season lengths or daily bag limits. The late game bird season will be announced next month. The state is divided into two zones to maximize hunting chances for all hunters. The North Dove Zone is between north is of U.S. Hwy. 84 south of U.S. Hwy. 84 and west of MS Hwy. 35. Season dates for the North Zone are Sept. 3-Oct. 9; Oct. 22-Nov. 6; and Dec. 10-Jan. 15. The South Dove Zone consists of areas south of U.S. Hwy. 84 and east of MS Hwy. 35, including Harrison, Hancock and Jackson counties. Season dates for the South Zone are Sept. 3 -Sept. 11; Oct.8- Nov. 13; and Dec.3-Jan.15. Legal huinting hours are one-half hour before sunrise until sunset. Here's the schedules: nThe Canada Geese season is Sept. 1-Sept. 30 with a Bag Limit of five, and possession of 15. nTeal starts Sept. 10-Sept. 25 with a big limit of 6 and 18 limit in possession.

Outdoors

The Nike Free line now going the distance

Nike first introduced the Free concept in 2004, and it was one of the pioneers in the minimalist running movement. The initial idea spawned when a Nike designer watched the Stanford cross-country team doing barefoot sprints in the grass. The first shoes in the line focused on offering protection from the ground, but not much else. Of course, running sprints in the grass isn't the same as running a marathon, and the Nike Free was never really designed for long-distance training. That is until now.

Outdoors

Six micro-movements that will help burn more calories

Exercising less with the right intensity is key to losing fat, but so, too, is simply moving your body more on a regular basis. Walk. Take the stairs. Do a few pushups here and there. Do 10 bodyweight squats before you eat. Pick up your kids. Run to the mailbox. Do some lunge walks down the hall. Get up out of your chair every 15 minutes and stretch.

Outdoors

13 things your trainer wants you to stop doing

If you've been sticking to an exercise regimen and aren't seeing results, or simply want to know what your trainer would tell you, politeness thrown to the wayside, you've come to the right place. Below, you'll find 13 things - mistakes, pet peeves - that top trainers want their clients to stop doing.

Outdoors

Wina Sturgeon: Stretching has plenty of benefits, but not necessarily the ones you thought

There are a lot of bogus myths when it comes to stretching. As an athlete, knowing the truth will definitely pay off for you. One of the biggest myths is that stretching is a warmup. It's not. Stretching, especially with a body that has not yet actually been warmed up, means the tissues are cold and not as elastic as they should be. The fibers of both muscle and white connective tissue will not easily slide past each other.

Outdoors

Wisconsin cyclist rode through test of suffering, endurance

By the time Dave Haase arrived in Annapolis, Md., and dismounted the Venge bike at long last, a modest crowd of about 50 people applauded him, many of them family and members of his crew. He gave a weary smile, collected his medal, granted one media interview and then took his team out to lunch, barely able to keep his eyelids open.

Outdoors

The case for taking a break from working out

During the years I lived in New York, I never had to really worry about staying relatively fit. Even when my gym time fell by the wayside for months at a time, I still walked close to two miles on a daily basis just during my commute alone, usually with heavy bags on hand. Carrying my groceries to my fourth-floor walk-up certainly felt like strength training, and typical shopping excursions called for a trek around Brooklyn. Consequently, "out of shape" was always a relative phrase.

Outdoors

A duo's journey to the Boston Marathon

Matt Burdette doesn't like talking about that day. On April 15, 2013, Burdette finished the Boston Marathon in 3 hours, 8 minutes and 8 seconds. All morning, friends and family stood along Boylston Street, waiting for him to cross the finish line, until leaving to join Burdette at the runner-reunite area.

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