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  • Video: Red tide algae will likely stick around for awhile

    DMR Chief Scientific Officer Kelly Lucas gives an update on the algae bloom currently in the Mississippi on Monday, December 14, 2015. Lucas said that in high concentration the algae can cause respiratory problems, especially in people that are already susceptible. She also said anglers can continue to fish in the Sound, but do not eat dead or distressed fish.

DMR Chief Scientific Officer Kelly Lucas gives an update on the algae bloom currently in the Mississippi on Monday, December 14, 2015. Lucas said that in high concentration the algae can cause respiratory problems, especially in people that are already susceptible. She also said anglers can continue to fish in the Sound, but do not eat dead or distressed fish. Amanda McCoy amccoy@sunherald.com
DMR Chief Scientific Officer Kelly Lucas gives an update on the algae bloom currently in the Mississippi on Monday, December 14, 2015. Lucas said that in high concentration the algae can cause respiratory problems, especially in people that are already susceptible. She also said anglers can continue to fish in the Sound, but do not eat dead or distressed fish. Amanda McCoy amccoy@sunherald.com

Unprecedented toxic algae lingers in Mississippi Sound

December 14, 2015 07:34 PM

UPDATED December 15, 2015 03:10 PM

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  • Making The Woven Heart basket

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