Ole Miss

Ole Miss trio expects to go in first round

Defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche, right, fights off a block by a scout during a position drill at Mississippi's NFL football Pro Day, Monday, March 28, 2016, in Oxford, Miss. The event is to showcase players for the upcoming NFL football draft. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche, right, fights off a block by a scout during a position drill at Mississippi's NFL football Pro Day, Monday, March 28, 2016, in Oxford, Miss. The event is to showcase players for the upcoming NFL football draft. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis) AP

CHICAGO - Laremy Tunsil says he felt disappointed when the Titans traded away the first pick in the NFL draft, but he shrugged away those emotions like he'd shrug off an edge rusher.

While the Ole Miss offensive tackle won't be the first of all names called Tunsil will undoubtedly be the first drafted among four Mississippi players who hope to be first round picks Thursday night at the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University.

Ole Miss defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche and wide receiver Laquon Treadwell - a Chicago area native - and Mississippi State defensive tackle Chris Jones are also in town.

All four participated in a youth football clinic put on by the NFL today.

Tunsil also made some non-football news Wednesday when it was learned he's the subject of a lawsuit filed by his stepfather Lindsey Miller. Their differences stem back to last summer when Miller's allegations set in motion a series of events that culminated with Tunsil's seven-game suspension handed down by the NCAA.

"He filed a lawsuit? I didn't know that. I didn't know he was going to bring that to the media's attention. I'm not going to speak on that," Tunsil said.

For months Tunsil was projected to go No. 1 as the Titans held the first pick. He's not expected to wait long for the call, but the earliest he'll be taken might be by the Chargers with the third pick.

"It's a part of the game. They didn't want the pick. I'm human, and it hurt. It happens," he said.

Former NFL coach Steve Mariucci, now an analyst with the league's TV network, says the trade is a good move for the Titans who now have four of the first 76 picks.

"They've got the young quarterback (Marcus Mariota), and he proved to be the real deal," he said. "It requires more than one guy. It requires several guys."

Mariucci expressed some concern - not much -- about Tunsil having played in mostly a two-point stance.

"He's ready to play. He's very good. I think he's going to be a Pro Bowlers in the league."

Prospects with a chance to be drafted in the first round are invited here for the festivities.

For Treadwell it means returning home. He played high school football in Crete, Ill., roughly 45 minutes from downtown. He was honored at his high school earlier this week.

Names of all prospects were called as they joined kids on the field for the youth clinic. Treadwell's name was the only one to draw noticeable cheers, more cheers than were heard for NFL commissioner Roger Goodell or Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Having the draft in Chicago is a "humbling and amazing experience," Treadwell said.

Treadwell and Notre Dame's Will Fuller are rated the best available wide receivers according to NFL.com.

Treadwell has gotten great reviews for his physicality, effort, determination and character. It's his speed that's been criticized and what has him projected in the back half of the first round though still in the first round.

He says he tells doubters to "watch the tape. I play ball, and I make plays week in and week out. I've done that all my life. I don't worry about the speed and other things they want to criticize me about."

Mariucci doesn't believe Treadwell will slide to the second round before his home fans.

"You want all your guys to run 4.4-something, but that's not the case. I think that 40 time is a little misleading. He plays faster and stronger than that. I believe in the kid. He's going to be a first rounder."

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