Sound Off

Sound Off for April 2: Leadership is definitely a problem in the federal government, VA

In this March 7, 2018, file photo, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin speaks at a news conference at the Washington Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington. Shulkin is making it clear he was fired from his job amid conflicting claims from the White House.
In this March 7, 2018, file photo, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin speaks at a news conference at the Washington Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington. Shulkin is making it clear he was fired from his job amid conflicting claims from the White House. AP file

Consequences needed

I am a retired career civil service employee with 35 years service. I agree that there is a lot of very good employees working in government. There are also many not very good ones. The problem is good managers and employees cannot do any thing to correct the behavior of the bad, therefore the bad are ignored ,and allowed to draw their pay and do nothing productive. Until rules are revised to allow disciplinary action against the bad employees, all activity possible should be privatized so efficient, economic, functions can prevail.

Good riddance

Former VA Secretary Shulkin’s comments about his firing are emblematic of what is wrong with the federal government. He said, “It should not be this hard to serve your country.” Think about it. Falsified patient records and no worries about getting fired sure make it a lot easier. Leaders must do whatever it takes, hard or not.

Disagree

Your commentary on the 3 main problems at the VA in the March 31 paper, insuring “leadership isn’t one of them,” raised an eyebrow. As a retired VA employee with 30 years of federal service, I can guarantee you that leadership is a huge problem and easily qualifies in the top three. A good percentage of problems would resolve themselves if the leadership was more talented. The article did confirm one of the reasons for this: the pay and other factors either don’t attract extremely talented leadership or the constant cuts drive those with talent back to the private sector. “Shooting themselves in the foot” is a pretty good analogy.

Not so easy

For the normal person, it’s so easy to determine how the BP funds should be allocated. It’s not so easy for the politician. I predict there will be no approved distribution until a method is found that will permit all politicians to get their hands on all they can grab, legally and illegally. Just watch.

No debate needed

Seems the Mississippi Legislature can’t agree on where the BP oil spill money should be spent. If there was some type of disaster in Jackson, natural or otherwise, causing widespread damage and there was $700 million dollars made available for damage repair and rebuilding, where would that money be spent? Gulfport? Biloxi? Pasagoula? No debate or discussion necessary, it goes to Jackson!

Man-made

I think a lot of people on the Coast don’t realize Mississippi beaches are mostly all man-made, artificial beaches created not too far back in history. The beaches were swampy grassy marshes before they dumped the sand, and that’s why they gotta keep maintaining the beaches.

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