Sound Off

Sound Off for Oct. 19: Students ‘too young’ for ‘Mockingbird’

Advance Placement English students Jakeyla Miller and Connor Elliott listen as a classmate reads during an AP class at Biloxi High School on May 13, 2013.
Advance Placement English students Jakeyla Miller and Connor Elliott listen as a classmate reads during an AP class at Biloxi High School on May 13, 2013. jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com File

Take it home

By following Stand Up’s logic, perhaps the players should wait and kneel at home.

No RIP for Peck

Gregory Peck must be roiling over in his grave, because of this being done in Biloxi Schools.

Noise pollution

Whatever happened to quiet neighborhoods? Now when you step outside, all you hear is planes, trains, dogs and people on their cell phones. Such a distraction.

Fess up

OK, let’s be honest. How many of you would have even thought of burning tickets and turning off NFL games before Trump made it an issue?

Question

To “Who to blame” who says it’s official that Trumpcare will cause healthcare costs to spiral out of control. Can I borrow your crystal ball?

Public is different

Ignorance is truly bliss. Public events which begin with the playing of our national anthem are historically proper venues to display proper respect en masse to the greatest country on Earth. There is no right or wrong behavior in private, and I dare say these ungrateful and disrespectful NFL players could also “take a knee” all they want in their homes whenever they want.

Where?

Inquiring minds wants to know. We see Biloxi business owners are complaining about the influx of homeless people. I remember when they tried to use a school in Biloxi to shelter the homeless. It was shot down. Where do they think the homeless should go? Maybe to their residential community.

Too young

As an English teacher who taught eighth-grade many times, may I, as a voice of reason, explain why “To Kill a Mockingbird” should not be taught in the eighth grade. The students are too young. They are beginning their first life changes from childhood to youth (not adulthood). Did these educators not take any educational, child, or adolescent, psychology courses? This wonderful book is one of my top 10 favorites. It should be saved for students who are at least in their junior year of high school. It is about so much more than race, so much more than the trial near the end. Part of its beauty is that it is told by a child who did not understand the meaning of what she recounted. Harper Lee wrote it for readers who could understand. Eighth graders are not yet those people.

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