Letters to the Editor

Readers views: What makes America great + Letter writer has Democrats all wrong

‘Love not hate makes America great,’ say MLK marchers at Capitol

Several hundred people marched on state Capitol Wednesday, April 4, 2018, in honor of the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his death.
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Several hundred people marched on state Capitol Wednesday, April 4, 2018, in honor of the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his death.

What makes America great

It’s not the size of our military or our economic power that makes America great; it is our values reflected by our Constitution and Bill of Rights emphasizing equality, fairness and justice for all. Equally important are our strong Judeo-Christian values advocating kindness, compassion in helping the less fortunate, honesty, truthfulness, loyalty, faithfulness, respect for law and order with no one above the law.

Foremost of all is the sanctity of the family and supporting the strong bond between children and parents. These values are the fabric holding our country together that make America great. From our very beginning our country’s leaders exemplified the above values and served as our models.

There are also divisive values that detract from America’s greatness that emphasize greed, selfishness, dishonesty, lying, cheating, bullying, taking advantage of the weak for personal gain and profit, and doing whatever it takes to accumulate more money, more power, or more prestige irrespective of the resultant harm.

All of us have both good and bad inside us that can be brought forth by those advocating negative values urging us to hate or those advocating positive values urging us to love one another.

When our leaders no longer tell the truth, do not obey the law and do not adhere to our traditional values, how can we expect our children and our country to embrace these time proven values?

Can America truly be great if we abandon our traditional values?

Harold Dawley

Diamondhead

Wetzel’s misunderstandings

In a recent Letter to the Editor (June 23, 2019) John Wetzel expressed puzzlement as to why anyone would want to be a Democrat. If he knew what a Democrat is, he might not be so puzzled, but he does not.

He claims that to be a Democrat is to be in favor of open borders. I am a Democrat and I am not in favor of open borders, so he is wrong on that point. If he thinks that without a wall we will have an open border, he is mistaken. There is no wall between North Korea and South Korea but theirs is definitely not an open border.

Wetzel also claims that if you are a Democrat and anyone disagrees with you, you will call them a racist. I disagree with Wetzel on numerous points, but I have never called him a racist and I have no reason to think that he is, so he is wrong on that point.

He also says to be a Democrat is to want all cows eliminated. Now his argument is just silly. I am a Democrat and I do not want all cows eliminated. Am I concerned about the influence of methane gas on our world and how to control it? Yes. And I am by no means the only Democrat who thinks in the preceding ways.

Richard E. Creel

Biloxi

Follow your heart, not the party

I’m sick and tired. Sick and tired of the so-called leaders in Congress, and sick and tired of the American people for voting for their return to office when their performance is substandard.

I served 30 years in the U.S. Navy. If a serviceman’s performance equaled that of the majority in Congress, he/she would be booted out. We can boot them out at the voting booth. If you, the American public, vote strictly for your party, rather than the person, you are as much a part of the problem as the person who is doing substandard work.

I’m appalled by the actions of one party working against the other simply because they don’t want the other party to succeed. Our country is declining because of these people who put themselves before country. It’s past time to wake up and follow your heart, not the party, at the voting booth. It’s past time for term limits in Congress.

John Bright

Gulfport

Climate change and population growth

A country’s “carbon footprint” expands and corresponds with its population growth. In the 1960s the population of the U.S. was around 200 million. Today the figure is closer to 330 million and growing.

When was the last time the world’s, or countries’, population explosion was factored into the climate change discussion? We cannot have it both ways, we cannot have population and immigration growth without growing our carbon footprint on the planet.

Any suggestion?

P.S. I would argue that the U.S. leads the world in recycling its waste products. Another factor left out of the carbon footprint debate.

David Mattina

Biloxi

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