Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor for Oct. 1: Most wanted fugitives story raises a question

The home of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers in Jackson is one step closer to becoming a national monument. The U.S. House voted May 15 to pass a bill that would establish the Medgar Evers National Monument in Jackson. The Senate has yet to vote on the measure but the Trump administration has opened the comment period to designate it a National Monument.
The home of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers in Jackson is one step closer to becoming a national monument. The U.S. House voted May 15 to pass a bill that would establish the Medgar Evers National Monument in Jackson. The Senate has yet to vote on the measure but the Trump administration has opened the comment period to designate it a National Monument. AP File

Make criminal records more accessible

Your article listing the most wanted fugitives makes me question our commitment to stop crime. I’m sure everyone has seen a person they thought might be wanted because of seeing the news media. Why doesn’t the general public have access to a database of people wanted for criminal offenses? There needs to be a user friendly, searchable database for the public to use allowing them to search by name, age, location, pictures, type of crimes, etc.

I believe that if the public had accessible user friendly data they would be using it to aid law enforcement. We need it and it should be promoted to the public for their use. You would almost think criminals are protected by privacy laws.

I owned a temporary help service for years, and one day a young man applied for work that I would swear I saw him on “Most Wanted” the night before. I called the number to the TV show explained the situation, they wanted his name, which in reply I said, “His real name or the name on the application?”

I know people who have been arrested didn’t pay their fines and are no longer living here but do they have a warrant? We could clean up crime by making criminals and their records more accessible.

William Linville

Biloxi

Our changing culture

In response to “Why no one listens” (letter, Sept. 23), yes, our culture is in constant change. Americans need to think about and care about what we are becoming. What are we to adapt to? And why? What should we change in order to became a healthier, wiser and stronger country?

We must think about, and act upon, the values that have made America strong, and a good place to live. Values like honesty, hard work and faith. So what if people think we are strange?

If our culture needs to change, let it be to the side of good, not to the worldly, backsliding culture that has crept in. Let that part of it go. Replace it with good moral values and character, and refuse to adapt any longer to what has be come “the norm.”

Alice Jones

Bay St. Louis

Preserve history of Evers’ home

On behalf of the Mississippi Legislative Black Caucus, I submitted a public comment to the Department of Park Services on Aug. 31, 2018, supporting legislation for the federal monument designation of Medgar and Myrlie Evers’ home in Jackson, Mississippi.

The placement of the Evers’ Home as a Civil Rights National Monument Designation, will allow the death of Medgar Evers and the civil rights movement to continue providing history for Mississippians and others who travel through the Magnolia State. Evers paid the ultimate price for his persistent commitment to equality for all when he was assassinated in the driveway of his home in Jackson on June 12, 1963. Medgar Evers’ work, service and legacy he left behind live on today and will for generations to come.

In addition, we request that this administration, including the Department of the Interior, continue providing complete protection to national parks, monuments and the millions of acres of land within its purview in order to preserve our nation’s rich history. Protecting our nation’s invaluable assets also ensures an educational aspect for all of our citizens. Eliminating or reducing the sizes of our national parks and removing monuments will adversely affect our nation’s cultural, spiritual and historical antiquities. Therefore, we encourage the Department of the Interior to support any congressional legislation to protect and preserve our nation’s storied history.

On behalf of the Mississippi Legislative Black Caucus, we pledge our support toward preserving the history of the Evers’ home and the civil rights movement.

Rep. Sonya Williams-Barnes

Gulfport

No to Kavanaugh

I urge Sens. Cindy Hyde-Smith and Roger Wicker to reject the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court. There are real questions about whether Judge Kavanaugh lied to Congress during his confirmation hearings for his current appointment to the D.C. circuit. It would be an insult to the rule of law to confirm for a lifetime appointment someone who has so little respect for being under oath that he lies to the Senate.

If for no other reason than to protect the integrity of the Senate hearing process, the Senators must vote against the confirmation of Judge Kavanaugh. If they need another reason, consider that he is deeply unpopular and the majority of Americans — including Mississippians — do not support his views on Roe vs. Wade.

Reject Kavanaugh.

Jennifer L. Alex

Gulfport

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