Hurricane

Katia is too close for comfort on 2017 hurricane list

Staff Sgt. Larry Banks, right, and Tech. Sgt. Jenna Daniel, 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron loadmasters, read instructions for U.S. Navy weather buoys April 12 at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi. These buoys were dropped in preparation for the Naval Oceanography unmanned systems Gulf of Mexico Operational Demonstration May 30 through June 1 in Gulfport. This joint training opportunity allows the 53rd WRS and Navy personnel to practice collecting and analyzing atmospheric and oceanic data. The Hurricane Hunters also are on a Caribbean Tour this week ahead of the 2017 hurricane season.
Staff Sgt. Larry Banks, right, and Tech. Sgt. Jenna Daniel, 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron loadmasters, read instructions for U.S. Navy weather buoys April 12 at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi. These buoys were dropped in preparation for the Naval Oceanography unmanned systems Gulf of Mexico Operational Demonstration May 30 through June 1 in Gulfport. This joint training opportunity allows the 53rd WRS and Navy personnel to practice collecting and analyzing atmospheric and oceanic data. The Hurricane Hunters also are on a Caribbean Tour this week ahead of the 2017 hurricane season. U.S. Air Force

It’s been an early start to the hurricane season that officially begins June 1, and some of the names of this year’s tropical cyclones are way too familiar.

Arlene, the first name on the 2017 Atlantic storm list, was assigned to a tropical storm that formed in the northern Atlantic last week. The next name in line is Bret. Here’s the whole list:

  • Arlene
  • Bret
  • Cindy
  • Don
  • Emily
  • Franklin
  • Gert
  • Harvey
  • Irma
  • Jose
  • Katia
  • Lee
  • Maria
  • Nate
  • Ophelia
  • Philippe
  • Rina
  • Sean
  • Tammy
  • Vince
  • Whitney

The National Hurricane Center has named storms since 1953 and the list is recycled every six years. So those that didn’t cause considerable damage in 2005 and 2011 are back for 2017. They will be recycled again in 2023 unless they pack a real punch, as five storms did in 2005.

Anyone from South Mississippi scanning the list of names will stop at Katia, which is only two letters away from “Katrina” the killer storm that landed on the Coast 12 years ago in August and still holds the record for most damage caused by a hurricane.

“The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity,” according to a press release from the National Hurricane Center. “If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it. Several names have been retired since the lists were created.”

Along with Katrina, we won’t see another Camille, Betsy, Gustav, Ike, Wilma or Sandy.

Katrina was retired from the list in 2005 — along with Dennis, Rita, Stan and Wilma — and Irene is gone from this list that was recycled in 2011. The names that were substituted by the World Meteorological Organization, which sets the procedure for naming storms, are too close for comfort for those who lived through them:

▪ Dennis is now Don

▪ Irene is now Irma

▪ Rita is now Rina

▪ Stan is now Sean

▪ Wilma is now Whitney

Biloxi’s Hurricane Hunters — the U.S Air Force reservists from the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron 403rd Wing at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi — are on a Caribbean Hurricane Awareness Tour this week. They’ll visit Mexico, Honduras, Cayman Islands, Turks and Caicos and Puerto Rico, giving tours of the WC-130J planes they fly directly into tropical storms and hurricanes to improve the forecasts.

“Several Caribbean countries were severely damaged last year by Hurricane Matthew and Hurricane Otto,” said National Hurricane Center director Rick Knabb. “Another season is just weeks away and we have to be prepared,” he said. “Simply hoping one of these storms won’t hit your community is not a good plan.”

Retired hurricane names by year

  • Agnes 1972
  • Alicia 1983
  • Allen 1980
  • Allison 2001
  • Andrew 1992
  • Anita 1977
  • Audrey 1957
  • Betsy 1965
  • Beulah 1967
  • Bob 1991
  • Camille 1969
  • Carla 1961
  • Carmen 1974
  • Carol 1954
  • Celia 1970
  • Cesar 1996
  • Charley 2004
  • Cleo 1964
  • Connie 1955
  • David 1979
  • Dean 2007
  • Dennis 2005
  • Diana 1990
  • Diane 1955
  • Donna 1960
  • Dora 1964
  • Edna 1968
  • Elena 1985
  • Eloise 1975
  • Erika 2015
  • Fabian 2003
  • Felix 2007
  • Fifi 1974
  • Flora 1963
  • Floyd 1999
  • Fran 1996
  • Frances 2004
  • Frederic 1979
  • Georges 1998
  • Gilbert 1988
  • Gloria 1985
  • Gustav 2008
  • Hattie 1961
  • Hazel 1954
  • Hilda 1964
  • Hortense 1996
  • Hugo 1989
  • Igor 2010
  • Ike 2008
  • Inez 1966
  • Ingrid 2013
  • Ione 1955
  • Irene 2011
  • Iris 2001
  • Isabel 2003
  • Isidore 2002
  • Ivan 2004
  • Janet 1955
  • Jeanne 2004
  • Joan 1988
  • Joaquin 2015
  • Juan 2003
  • Katrina 2005
  • Keith 2000
  • Klaus 1990
  • Lenny 1999
  • Lili 2002
  • Luis 1995
  • Marilyn 1995
  • Matthew 2016
  • Michelle 2001
  • Mitch 1998
  • Noel 2007
  • Opal 1995
  • Otto 2016
  • Paloma 2008
  • Rita 2005
  • Roxanne 1995
  • Sandy 2012
  • Stan 2005
  • Tomas 2010
  • Wilma 2005

National Hurricane Center

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