Weather

Miss. governor: Stay safe, more rain is on the way from Barry

Tropical Storm Barry brings flooding threat to Louisiana, Mississippi

Hurricane Barry became a tropical storm when it made landfall on the Louisiana coast on July 13. It’s expected to weaken to a tropical depression July 14.
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Hurricane Barry became a tropical storm when it made landfall on the Louisiana coast on July 13. It’s expected to weaken to a tropical depression July 14.

Gov. Phil Bryant on Saturday urged South Mississippi residents to stay vigilant protecting themselves from Tropical Storm Barry.

During an afternoon press conference at the Harrison County Courthouse in Gulfport, Bryant and other state officials said the Coast has already received about 5 inches of rain from the storm, and another 2 inches to 4 inches could come overnight.

Bryant was especially worried about people trying to drive through standing water.

“We’ve been concerned about the roadways,” said Bryant, noting Hancock County alone has dozens of impassable roads. “I would tell everyone out there to be extremely careful. Please slow down. I just left U.S. 90 and some people are not.”

State emergency officials have search and rescue teams standing by not only on the Coast, but also upstate.

“I hope this is not going to be a terrible event through the night, but we are planning” as if it will be, said Gregory Michel, director of the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency. “Be vigilant. Pay attention to the weather warnings.”

Officials said a lot of land in the Mississippi Delta is already saturated, and rains from Barry will only make things worse.

Said Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann: “This is a difficult event for Mississippi and it is difficult for us to go forward ... we ask everyone out in the country to pray for us.”

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