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Live updates: Flash flood watches in effect through Sunday for Tropical Storm Barry

Hurricane Hunters spy rainbow as they fly Tropical Storm Barry

As residents of the Gulf Coast braced for the onslaught of Tropical Storm Barry on July 12, the US Air Force’s Hurricane Hunters shared this video, showing a rainbow peeking through Barry’s clouds as they few through the storm.
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As residents of the Gulf Coast braced for the onslaught of Tropical Storm Barry on July 12, the US Air Force’s Hurricane Hunters shared this video, showing a rainbow peeking through Barry’s clouds as they few through the storm.

Hurricane Barry officially made landfall Saturday afternoon near the middle of the Louisiana coastline and was quickly downgraded to a tropical storm.

The Mississippi Coast and New Orleans avoided significant impacts Saturday, and officials say heavy rains are still possible Sunday.

Here are local updates:

9 a.m. Sunday

All storm surge watches have ended for the Mississippi Coast.

Flash flood watches are still in effect for Harrison, Hancock, Jackson and Pearl River counties. Remants of Barry could bring up to 2-4 inches more of rain.

Rain forecast:

  • Sunday: Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. High near 83. Southeast wind 10 to 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between three quarters and one inch possible.
  • Sunday night: Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. Low around 74. South wind 10 to 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.
  • Monday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 87. South wind 10 to 15 mph. New rainfall amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.

The only river flooding warning that remains is for the Pearl River.

Closed streets in Hancock County:

  • Rainier on Westside of HWY 603 had 5 streets
  • Lagan on Eastside of HWY 603 had 6 streets
  • Central Avenue on Eastside of HWY 603 had 23 streets
  • Jordan River Drive had 1 streets
  • Chapman Road on Eastside of HWY 603 had 2 streets
  • Avenue D on Westside of HWY 603 had 3 streets
  • Kiln-Waveland Cut-off Road had 5 streets
  • River/Union Street on Westside of Hwy 603 had 4 streets
  • Harbor Drive on Westside of Hwy 603 had 6 streets
  • Heron Bay/Ansley Road had 7 streets
  • Jordan River Shores had 2 streets

10 p.m. Saturday

River flood warnings canceled in Harrison and Hancock counties but remain for Pearl River and George counties.

A storm surge watch remains from Louisiana to Biloxi.

Barry is expected to turn north Sunday and move through central Louisiana to Arkansas through Monday.

The Louisiana coast is still seeing tropical storm conditions, the National Hurricane Center reported.

9:21 p.m.

Tornado warning issued for Poplarville until 9:45 p.m.

6 p.m.

Tropical Storm Barry is creeping inland across Louisiana and sending feeder bands as far east as Mobile, where strong storms lingered across the Alabama county for most of Saturday.

The flash flood warning has expired for Harrison and Jackson counties but remains for Mobile. A flash flood watch remains for all of South Mississippi through 7 p.m. Sunday.

An additional 2-4 inches of rain could fall tonight, National Weather Service forecasters say, and more heavy rains are possible Sunday. Tornadoes are still possible through Saturday night.

Jackson County is no longer under a storm surge watch, and it has been reduced to a coastal flood advisory. A storm surge watch remains from Louisiana to Biloxi.

2:45 p.m.

Harrison and Jackson counties have been upgraded to a flash flood warning until 5:15 p.m. as feeder bands from Tropical Storm Barry move over the Coast.

Six inches of rain have already fallen and an additional 2 to 4 inches are possible, the National Weather Service in Slidell says.

1 p.m.

Barry has been downgraded to a tropical storm after making landfall near the middle of the Louisiana coastline.

Storm surge warnings and watches remain for the Mississippi Coast, along with flash flood watches.

Noon

Frida Fest in Bay St. Louis has been moved to 4 p.m. in 100 Men Hall, 303 Union Street.

So far this afternoon, Mobile and Jackson County have gotten a strong feeder band while the western portions of the Coast have seen steady, light rain and dry spells without rain.

The next National Hurricane Center update is at 1 p.m.

10 a.m.

Barry upgraded to a hurricane after winds of 74 mph were detected in an area on the east side of the storm, the National Hurricane Center says, but the difference from a tropical storm means little in terms of impact.

The tropical storm watch has ended for the Mississippi Coast, but a storm surge warning remains from the Louisiana line to Biloxi and a storm surge watch is in effect for Jackson County.

The storm still has a “less than classical” lopsided appearance with most of the rain and clouds still on the south side of the cyclone. While the slow-moving storm is expected to quickly weaken in the next 24 hours as it moves onshore south of Lafayette, all that rain is still expected to impact the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts. The rainfall expectations have not changed.

The coastal counties remain under a flash flood watch until 7 a.m. Sunday. Hancock and western parts of Harrison counties could still see wind gusts of 39 to 57 mph. There’s also a slight risk of tornadoes through this evening.

“The feeder bands associated with (Hurricane) Barry are moving into Harrison County, bringing rain, winds with gusts of more than 20 mph and possible severe thunderstorms,” Harrison County Emergency Management Director Rupert Lacy said. “This is going to be a marathon rain event, not a sprint. Harrison County residents and our visitors should remain vigilant and use caution when outside and when driving.”

Flood warnings have been issued for all the major rivers in Harrison, Hancock and Pearl River counties.

8:30 a.m.

A river flood warning has been issued for Harrison County.

The Tchoutacabouffa River is expected to crest at 10 feet. The Biloxi River is expected to crest at 15 feet. The Wolf River is expected to crest at 11 feet.

Barricades will be placed on flooded roads in the county.

“Our deputies will be out and they will write citations if drivers go around barricaded roadways,” Sheriff Troy Peterson said in a release.

7 a.m.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has issued a state of emergency as Barry inches toward landfall.

Barry’s maximum winds increased to 70 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. He’s moving northwest at 5 mph.

At 7 a.m., Barry was about 50 miles away from Morgan City.

Harrison County Emergency Management Director Rupert Lacy said additional watches or warning could happen Saturday morning.

6 a.m.

The Coast is still under a tropical storm watch. Hancock and Harrison Counties are under a storm surge warning. Jackson County is under a storm surge watch.

There have been minimal power outages reported in all three Coastal Counties.

East and central Jackson County were under a tornado warning until 7 a.m.

Barry’s slow movement will result in heavy rain being poured on southeastern Louisiana and South Mississippi through Sunday.

Flash floods and river flooding will become increasingly likely as Barry moves ashore, the NWS said Saturday morning.

“It’s powerful. It’s strengthening. And water is going to be a big issue,” National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham told the AP.

There are more than 100 flooded streets reported in Hancock County by 4:30 a.m., Emergency Manager Brian “Hootie” Adam said.

As residents of the Gulf Coast braced for the onslaught of Tropical Storm Barry on July 12, the US Air Force’s Hurricane Hunters shared this video, showing a rainbow peeking through Barry’s clouds as they few through the storm.

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