Weather

Coast has wettest, second-hottest first half of the year ever

Coast anglers try to get some fishing in as storm clouds roll by at Ken Combs pier in Gulfport on Friday morning.
Coast anglers try to get some fishing in as storm clouds roll by at Ken Combs pier in Gulfport on Friday morning. ttisbell@sunherald.com

The first six months of the year have been the wettest and second-hottest in South Mississippi, according to the National Weather Service.

Gulfport and Pascagoula have recorded the most rainfall ever from January to June: 48.92 inches and 46.76 inches respectively.

“We did have some rather big rainfall events, especially Tropical Storm Cindy that contributed quite a bit to that,” said Robert Wagner, meteorologist for the weather service in New Orleans.

And even though heat indexes have been topping 100 degrees, the weather service said a warm winter is what pushed up the average temperature to the No. 2 spot this year. It was also the second-hottest first six months for the entire country. The hottest year on record for the area and the country was in 2012.

The average temperature for the first half year was 68.2 in Gulfport and 66.8 in Pascagoula.

Forecast

The hot and wet weather trend continues this weekend.

You’ll be taking a gamble if you head outside; there’s a 50 percent chance of rain Saturday and Sunday across South Mississippi.

A weak cold front is headed this way, but may not make it as far south as the Coast.

“But it will be close enough to help produce showers and thunderstorms, especially during the late morning and afternoon.” Wagner said.

There is a marginal risk of severe weather Saturday and Sunday, with the main threats being damaging winds and large hail.

The storms are expected to be slow-moving and scattered.

“They’ll dump quite a bit of rain in one place and 5 miles away you may not have anything,” Wagner said.

Tropic watch

Out in the Atlantic Ocean, a tropical depression has been moving northwest toward the Bahamas. But conditions are not good for it to develop, and National Hurricane Center forecasters said Friday it had weakened considerably and was expected to dissipate into a low-pressure system.

Lauren Walck: 228-896-2393, @laurenwalck

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