Weather

Good news on first day of fall: Cold front could be coming

NOAA satellite image taken at midnight Wednesday. A cold front moving across the Pacific Ocean might bring cold air to the Coast next week for the start of the fall season.
NOAA satellite image taken at midnight Wednesday. A cold front moving across the Pacific Ocean might bring cold air to the Coast next week for the start of the fall season. Weather Underground via AP

Unlike last year, when cool, dry air dropped temperatures to a crisp 68 degrees overnight, the first day of fall Thursday won’t really feel like it.

September has been much warmer than average, which is no surprise after NASA recorded a record-hot July and August for the entire planet.

But there may be some relief in sight, as a promising cold front could reach the Coast early next week.

“Right now, the energy that will drive that cold front is over the Pacific Ocean,” said Andrew Ansorge, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in New Orleans.

But so far the U.S. and European models disagree on where and when the front will reach land, so the weather service has split the difference between the two.

“Right now what we’re doing is we’re taking kind of a blend of the models,” he said. “So some models show it coming through (the Gulf Coast), some models show it not coming through. Some models are going to be warm and some are going to be cooler. And so when we do a blend it’s kind of averaging out.”

When the front reaches the western United States on Friday or Saturday, he said, the weather service will have a better idea of its effect.

But don’t pull out the scarves and pumpkin spice just yet, the “cold” front will just noticeably cool down the still-sweltering Coast.

So far, the average temperature for September in Biloxi has been 81.5 degrees, Ansorge said. That’s only a few degrees off the hottest September ever — 83.1 degrees in 1925.

Compare that with last year, when a few September nights dipped into the 50s.

This week, the highs will stay near 90 and lows in the low 70s. But if the cold front is strong enough to punch through the Southern heat next week, Ansorge said, that could change.

If only briefly.

Lauren Walck: 228-896-2393, @laurenwalck

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