Crawdaddy

Dark horse for governor makes a point about sorry state of Republicans, Democrats

By Paul Hampton

jphampton@sunherald.com

Twitter: @jpaulhampton

Kentucky Independent gubernatorial candidate Drew Curtis, center, replies to a question as Democratic candidate Jack Conway, left, and Republican candidate Matt Bevin wait their turns during the Kentucky Bluegrass Poll Gubernatorial Debate at Bellarmine University in Louisville on Sept. 15. Curtis polled just a sliver too low to make the next debate and that may have sunk his campaign.
Kentucky Independent gubernatorial candidate Drew Curtis, center, replies to a question as Democratic candidate Jack Conway, left, and Republican candidate Matt Bevin wait their turns during the Kentucky Bluegrass Poll Gubernatorial Debate at Bellarmine University in Louisville on Sept. 15. Curtis polled just a sliver too low to make the next debate and that may have sunk his campaign. ASSOCIATED PRESS

"Everyone says they want a candidate like me, who doesn’t bow to ideology, who looks out for society instead of selling government to the highest bidder, and most of all is smart enough to handle the unknown challenges ahead."

Guess who. Better yet, guess which party. Conservative? Liberal?

That's was his point when he got into politics -- about nine months ago. In a quest to become governor of a Southern state.

He could be a certain truck driver from Mississippi, but it isn't Robert Gray, the Democratic candidate for governor here.

It's Drew Curtis of Fark, the guy who parlayed a link to a news story about a fighter pilot who crashed while mooning another pilot into an empire of the absurd. And, he made some good money in the process. Now he's running for governor of Kentucky in a three-man race.

He calls himself a citizen candidate, who should make him appeal to those wide-eyed folks who dream of citizens riding on horseback to Congress, creating as few problems as possible, then riding off back home to the farm. In other words, not today's careerists, who ride off each evening to dine with lobbyists.

"My friends thought I was insane to do this— why take on a year’s worth of tedious work to fight for a job taking on problems that likely can’t be fixed?" Curtis wrote in an Opinion piece today at Wired. "Well, like pretty much all of us, I feel like the political process isn’t representing our interests. A couple of parties dominate the process, limiting choice and grappling for power instead of trying to solve real problems. But at Fark, I have seen how effective the Internet can be at taking down entrenched gatekeepers and empowering regular people. So this year, I decided to see if I could harness that power toward changing politics."

If not for a couple of missteps, his campaign might have worked. It still might. And it definitely has the establishment's attention. Read his take on the race here at Wired.

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