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In case you have trouble remembering those campaign promises

Border Patrol agent Eduardo Olmos walks near the secondary fence separating Tijuana, Mexico, background, and San Diego in San Diego.
Border Patrol agent Eduardo Olmos walks near the secondary fence separating Tijuana, Mexico, background, and San Diego in San Diego. AP

You could say there is some disagreement among Americans on President-elect Donald Trump’s chances for success.

Gallup, for example, found more than half of Americans said they had confidence Trump could handle U.S. interests abroad, and could work with Congress. Fewer than half believe he is up to handling a international crisis, using the military wisely or preventing major scandals in his administration.

(Obama and President George W. Bush were above 70 percent at this point in those areas.)

Trump has promised much, including his ubiquitous vow to Make America Great Again.

Here are some benchmarks to measure how well he’s doing after the first year or so.

Trump has promised to build a wall to secure our borders. The United States has 650 miles of fence or impediment of some sort on the 1,900 miles of southern border.

“I am going to be the greatest jobs president that God ever created,” Trump told supporters in New Hampshire early last year after winning the New Hampshire primary.

The U.S. added an average of 180,000 jobs a month last year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Trump told “60 Minutes” shortly after the election that he would immediately deport 2 million to 3 million illegal immigrants.

The Pew Research Center says there are 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants, making the U.S. a target-rich environment for that promise.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement said there were 240,255 deportations in FY 2016.

Some random numbers that show where America stands at the twilight of the Obama administration.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was at 19,762.60 at the end of 2016. The S&P 500 was at 2,238.83 and the Nasdaq Composite Index at 5,383.12.

Unemployment was 4.6 percent (that’s the official rate). Gallup reminds us that the “real unemployment rate” is 9.3 percent.

The graduation rate 83.2 percent (students from low-income families are still lagging far behind other kids)

The poverty rate was 13.5 percent for 2015, the latest annual statistic available. The poverty line was $24,036 for a family of two adults two children.

Real median household income was $72,165 in that same year.

The Gross Domestic Product growth rate was 3.5. percent.

Total health care spending was $3.2 trillion and the annual health insurance premium for an average family was $18,142, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Paul Hampton: 228-896-2330, @JPaulHampton

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