Politics & Government

Lottery helps fund education in Louisiana, but that won’t be a main priority in Mississippi

Here are the states with the highest and lowest paid teachers

Teachers across the country have been walking out of their classrooms demanding higher wages and better funding for their schools. The National Center for Education Statistics reported the states with the highest and lowest paid teachers.
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Teachers across the country have been walking out of their classrooms demanding higher wages and better funding for their schools. The National Center for Education Statistics reported the states with the highest and lowest paid teachers.

Gov. Phil Bryant is expected to sign a bill that would allow a lottery in Mississippi, but earnings earmarked for the state will be spent differently than in Louisiana.

Louisiana law requires 35 percent of the earnings from lottery winners go into a state treasury program that funds K-12 education across the state.

The lottery has provided more than $150 million to Louisiana’s schools for each of the past five years, rising as high as $187 million in 2016. And the first $500,000 in annual lottery proceeds is earmarked for programs for people with gambling problems.

The Mississippi bill, though, will make roads and bridges a priority for Mississippi lottery proceeds. It was passed by the House and the Senate on Tuesday and sent to Bryant, who’s expected to sign it.

Money from Mississippi’s lottery haul won’t go to education until $80 million is spent on roads and bridges. The lottery is expected to generate $40 million the first year and lawmakers hope it will eventually raise more than $100 million.

The Mississippi House did an about face after voting down the bill hours before they passed it.

Here’s who changed their votes:

Coast Rep. Doug McLeod (R-Lucedale) voted no on the lottery bill Monday but reversed course to yes on Tuesday.

Others who changed to yes are: Ed Blackmon of Canton, Debra Gibbs of Jackson and Gregory Holloway of Hazlehurst and Republicans Kevin Ford of Vicksburg, Joey Hood of Ackerman, Jody Steverson of Ripley and Cory Wilson of Madison.

Coast Rep. Jeramey Anderson (D-Escatawpa) votes yes Monday but no on Tuesday. Others who changed to no votes are Kathy Sykes of Jackson and Republican Larry Byrd of Petal.

Justin Mitchell; 228-604-0705; @JustinMitchell_
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