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Driver straddling railroad tracks tells cops GPS made her do it, Penn. police say

Pennsylvania police released this photo after a driver traveling on railroad tracks told them her GPS advised her to take the route.
Pennsylvania police released this photo after a driver traveling on railroad tracks told them her GPS advised her to take the route. Duquesne police

This woman’s GPS might be out to get her.

Police headed to railroad tracks in Duquesne, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday around 10 p.m. on reports that there was a car on the tracks, police said in a Facebook post Wednesday.

The car’s driver — a woman from outside of Pittsburgh — gave officers an unusual explanation: She said her GPS told her to take the route onto the tracks, according to police.

Police had the woman’s car towed from the tracks and cited her for careless driving.

The woman was ober, and there weren’t medical problems that could have explained her decision-making, police said.

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A photo police shared from the scene shows the woman’s white sedan straddling one of the rails, apparently stuck there. Running parallel to the two sets of tracks is a roadway that other drivers are using.

“It happens all the time there,” one Facebook user commented. “Kinda head shaking.”

She’s not the first — and won’t be the last — driver led astray by her GPS.

Police in eastern Iowa issued a frustrated warning to drivers in May after at least four people got their vehicles trapped in dirt ravines, The Des Moines Register reported. GPS systems had taken the drivers down what the newspaper described as a “basically non-existent road,” which is riddled with deep puddles and ruts.

Photos of the perilous road show drivers probably should have known better.

“Use your brain,” said Mount Vernon Police Chief Doug Shannon, according to The Register. “If your brain tells you not to go down, that’s probably not a good way to go.”

Even professional drivers fall for misleading tricks played by GPS systems.

In July, a man driving an 18-wheeler nearly plowed into the ocean before a sandy beach stopped his 53-foot truck from going any further, The Charlotte Observer reported. He had reportedly been confused by his GPS.

Carl Seto, who towed the 18-wheeler out for $2,000, said he rescues two to three buses or trucks from the area yearly, The Virginian-Pilot reported.

“They don’t follow the signs,” Seto said, according to the Virginian-Pilot. “They just keep going.”

Washington, DC, police have identified a suspect caught on video hitting a Greyhound bus with a car jack and a bat, and then driving her Audi into the driver, police said.

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