George Malvaney, who headed Mississippi's cleanup from the 2010 BP oil catastrophe, was determined as a younger man to turn around his life after joining the Ku Klux Klan and spending time in prison. His first book, "Cups Up," chronicles the insights he gained along the way and his rejection of racism.
George Malvaney, who headed Mississippi's cleanup from the 2010 BP oil catastrophe, was determined as a younger man to turn around his life after joining the Ku Klux Klan and spending time in prison. His first book, "Cups Up," chronicles the insights he gained along the way and his rejection of racism. John Fitzhugh jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com file
George Malvaney, who headed Mississippi's cleanup from the 2010 BP oil catastrophe, was determined as a younger man to turn around his life after joining the Ku Klux Klan and spending time in prison. His first book, "Cups Up," chronicles the insights he gained along the way and his rejection of racism. John Fitzhugh jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com file