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How you can welcome to the Coast sailors who fought ISIS

Ingalls invites Coast residents to welcome sailors on the USS Ramage, coming in the week of Thanksgiving after fighting in Syria and Iraq.
Ingalls invites Coast residents to welcome sailors on the USS Ramage, coming in the week of Thanksgiving after fighting in Syria and Iraq. U.S. Navy

Ingalls built it years ago. And it’s coming home Thanksgiving week, with 300 sailors aboard who fought the Islamic State, for an extensive refurbishing.

The USS Ramage, a guided missile destroyer, is fresh from fighting in Syria and Iraq. It was there in July as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group.

Anyone on the Coast is invited to line the beach and welcome the sailors and the ship home.

Ingalls Shipbuilding, the Coast’s branch of Huntington Ingalls Industries, is asking those interested to line Pascagoula’s Beach Boulevard and the Point, a park at the west end of Beach Boulevard.

The ship is coming in Monday, Nov. 21, shortly after 7 a.m. Ingalls will have workers handing out American flags at the Point.

You can also bring your own.

Do the sailors like such greetings? They usually line the deck, similar to manning the rail, as the ship gets close to shore.

Bill Glenn, a spokesman for Ingalls, said the shipyard workers are excited about the arrival.

The ship was part of an eight-month deployment with the Carrier Strike Group. Then in September, the Navy awarded Ingalls the contract to modernize and overhaul the Ramage, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, with a $14 million base contract and options of up to $21 million.

The Ramage was built at Ingalls and delivered to the Navy in 1995.

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company with divisions in Virginia and Pascagoula, the builder of more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder to date.

It employs 11,000 in Pascagoula and a total of 35,000 company-wide. It also provides engineering, manufacturing and management services to the nuclear energy, oil and gas markets.

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