Education

Students in Louisiana likely to learn cursive in school again

WILL SENTELL

THE ADOVOCATE

Then-third-grader Logan Gibson receives help from a classmate while learning the cursive alphabet at White Lick Elementary School in Brownsburg, Ind., on April 22, 2011. The reading and writing of cursive has become less common to a growing number of young people as many school districts are spending far less time teaching it. Lawmakers in Washington state are considering a bill that would make the instruction of cursive writing mandatory in all schools.
Then-third-grader Logan Gibson receives help from a classmate while learning the cursive alphabet at White Lick Elementary School in Brownsburg, Ind., on April 22, 2011. The reading and writing of cursive has become less common to a growing number of young people as many school districts are spending far less time teaching it. Lawmakers in Washington state are considering a bill that would make the instruction of cursive writing mandatory in all schools. New York Times File Photo

The proposal, Senate Bill 275, breezed through the House and now returns to the Senate for one change.

Under the revision, the writing rules would take effect for the 2017-18 school year, not the 2016-17 term.

House Education Committee Chairwoman Nancy Landry R-Lafayette, who offered the amendment, said she did so at the request of the Louisiana School Boards Association.

Landry said an LSBA survey showed that 24 of Louisiana’s 70 school districts, including some of the largest in the state, do not teach cursive writing now and need time to prepare.

Fore more, visit The Advocate's website.

  Comments