Crime

She had 247 grams of meth in her pants, feds say, but that’s not all troopers found

Aaliyah Williamson and Jonathan Jarvis
Aaliyah Williamson and Jonathan Jarvis Harrison County Sheriff's Department

A state trooper apparently had his gun drawn when a woman pulled 247 grams of crystal meth out of her pants in a traffic stop, a court document indicates.

The driver of the vehicle had already told the trooper he had a firearm in the vehicle, and the pistol had been stolen, an affidavit said.

The traffic stop in Hancock County on Oct. 24 led to the seizure of other drugs as well, an agent with the DEA High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Task Force wrote in his sworn statement.

Jonathan Jarvis, 29, and Aaliyah Williamson, 23, are held without bond.

They pleaded not guilty on drug trafficking and related charges Monday in U.S. District Court. They are set for trial on a court calendar that starts Jan. 8.

The affidavit says these are the other drugs seized from the vehicle: 29 1/2 doses of alprazolam, 14 doses of acetaminophen/oxycodone, 89 grams of marijuana and about an ounce of promethazine syrup, the agent said.

Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety medicine known by brand names such as Xanax.

Acetaminophen/oxycodone is a narcotic pain-killer sold under brand names such as Percoset.

Promethazine syrup, also sold as Phenergan, is used for nausea, motion sickness and allergies. When prescribed with codeine, it’s a narcotic cough syrup. It also has a sedative effect when mixed with other drugs.

The state trooper reported the couple was traveling eastbound on Interstate 10 in a 2006 Chevrolet Impala that was following too close to another vehicle. They stopped for his blue lights near the 29 mile marker.

The trooper said he noticed the female passenger “making furtive movements” as if she was trying to hide something in the front of her pants.

The 247 grams of meth is the equivalent of about 49 doses, narcotics agents say.

Other items seized included digital scales, plastic bags, two cell phones and a stolen Smith and Wesson pistol, the affidavit said.

The car had a Mississippi license plate but neither of them had a valid Mississippi driver’s license, the affidavit said.

According to the document, Jarvis admitted he was on probation for a drug conviction and said he had bought the meth, also known as ice, in Hancock County earlier that day.

Jarvis said he’d been buying meth for five months, the agent wrote, and he said Williamson had bought the gun for protection so they wouldn’t get robbed during drug deals.

Williamson reportedly said she had bought the pistol from “a smoker” in Bay St. Louis for $30.

A grand jury indicted them Nov. 7. They face one count each of conspiracy, possession with intent to distribute meth, possession of a stolen firearm and carrying a firearm during a drug trafficking crime.

Jarvis faces an additional charge of felon in possession of a firearm.

Robin Fitzgerald: 228-896-2307, @robincrimenews

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