Crime

Cameron May: ‘In order to become a god, I had to commit an illegal act’

Cameron May cries while describing his 2015 assault of a woman at an Ocean Springs apartment complex during his trial for sexual assault in Jackson County Circuit Court in Pascagoula on Wednesday, March 22 2017.
Cameron May cries while describing his 2015 assault of a woman at an Ocean Springs apartment complex during his trial for sexual assault in Jackson County Circuit Court in Pascagoula on Wednesday, March 22 2017. jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com

Cameron May said he was half asleep when he heard a woman’s voice whispering the name, Naberius, which he learned was a “demonic” god with 19 legions of demons under his command.

May, 26, said he associated the name with an illustration he had created that he described as an “invisible man with glasses.”

Once the name came to him, he learned the demonic god he had began to worship required his followers to commit certain acts to become a demonic god themselves.

“Basically, (it) came to me (that) in order to become a god, I had to ... commit an illegal act,” May said Wednesday, his voice stuttering at times. “This evil act had to be physical.”

May was testifying Wednesday in his trial on charges of kidnapping, sexual battery and two counts of aggravated assault. The Sept. 10, 2015, crime occurred at The Dominion Apartments on Holcomb Boulevard in Ocean Springs.

He has pleaded not guilty by reason of criminal insanity.

The day of the assault, May said he stopped at four different apartment complexes before deciding to attack the former manager at the Ocean Springs complex. He said he chose the site because he didn’t see any security on site or security cameras that could catch him on tape.

He also said he decided to carry out his “evil act” at an apartment complex because it came to him that “it was basically like the best environment to carry this out.”

Before he went inside and attacked the woman, he said, he had second thoughts.

“I’m sitting there thinking, ‘Do I really want to do this?’ and I look down and that’s when I made my mind up,” he said.

May began to cry briefly when he went to talk about his attack, but the judge briefly recessed and May was fine when he resumed his testimony.

He talked about his state of mind during the attack, saying when he went back in the apartment office and confronted the victim, he “was focused not just on the physical assault itself” but also about the “bridge being made (for him) to become a (demonic) god.”

A psychologist also testified on May’s behalf, saying he diagnosed the D’Iberville High School graduate with a a delusional disorder related to schizophrenia.

“With certain mental illness like schizophrenia and delusional disorder, they man seem very rational, very calm at times, but then also at the core of that is a very irrational and very insane idea,” said Psychologist Stefan Massong.

District Attorney countered those claims on cross-examination. He pointed out that May himself testified he he could have “controlled his impulse” that day, but decided against it.

Another psychologist, Chris Lott, said May “knew right and wrong.”

“He planned this,” Lott said. “He knew the setting there. He knew the quality of his actions and he also knew his actions were wrong.”

In addition, Lott said, May did not fit the state definition of the criminally insane.

In earlier testimony, the victim told jurors how she felt like she was going to die the day of the attack.

A doctor later testified that the victim had to be transferred from Ocean Springs Hospital to a Level 1 trauma center in Alabama because her injuries were so severe and life-threatening. Her brain, he said, was hemorrhaging.

The victim said she begged for her life for the sake of her daughter, but nothing she said stopped May from attacking her. The Sun Herald does not identify sex crime victims.

Jurors heard closing arguments Wednesday afternoon, and the jury began deliberations.

Margaret Baker: 228-896-0538, @Margar45

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