Jackson County

Moss Point officials vote to cut pay, travel for Mayor Mario King. Here are the details.

‘The city is being destroyed.’ Moss Point residents want to hold mayor accountable.

Amid allegations and lawsuits against Moss Point mayor Mario King, community members are calling others to action to hold city officials accountable. Residents met Monday night to recruit citizens to attend city meetings and have their voiced heard.
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Amid allegations and lawsuits against Moss Point mayor Mario King, community members are calling others to action to hold city officials accountable. Residents met Monday night to recruit citizens to attend city meetings and have their voiced heard.

The Board of Aldermen on Tuesday voted 5 to 2 in favor of overriding Mayor Mario King’s veto of an administrative policy that calls for an end to any of his travel and a 15% cut in his salary.

Voting against the measure were aldermen Chuck Redmond and Robert Byrd.

Alderman Sherwood Bradford proposed the new administrative policies as a result of mounting lawsuits against the mayor — one by current and former employees alleging age discrimination and harassment, and another by Alderman Ennit Morris.

Bradford’s proposed policy changes included restricting the carrying of firearms in City Hall with the exception of the police department, requiring board approval for a city vehicle to travel more than 50 miles outside the city limits, and restricting the mayor from making any press releases other than ones on his own behalf.

In addition, the policy requires all city vehicles to be parked at City Hall by 5 p.m. unless they are being used for official city business.

The policy also effectively ends all travel for the mayor and the other elected officials.

In effect, King is looking at an estimated $11,000 cut in his salary, and possibly another 5% reduction for each violation of the policy.

Since the mayor took office, current and former employees allege King has harassed or discriminated against non-millennial employees to try force them out.

The mayor has vowed to fight the move by the Board by filing an injunction that would lead to the matter being resolved in a courtroom.

But on Tuesday, the Board followed through with one of its new policy changes when it voted against approving the mayor’s travel to a Coastal Transportation Summit.

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Margaret Baker is an investigative reporter whose search for truth exposed corrupt sheriffs, a police chief and various jailers and led to the first prosecution of a federal hate crime for the murder of a transgendered person. She worked on the Sun Herald’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Hurricane Katrina team. When she pursues a big story, she is relentless.
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