Harrison County

Fishbone Alley makes travel list of ‘most amazing’ unknown streets

Visitors walk through Fishbone Alley in downtown Gulfport during Gulfport's View The Cruise on the first day of Cruisin' The Coast on Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016.
Visitors walk through Fishbone Alley in downtown Gulfport during Gulfport's View The Cruise on the first day of Cruisin' The Coast on Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016. Sun Herald File

Fishbone Alley is becoming known as one of the most unusual and enjoyable American streets.

Right up there with Printer’s Alley, the Nashville, Tennessee, pedestrian walkway. Gulfport officials had a coastal version of Printer’s Alley in mind when the city decided to turn a dingy alley filled with dumpsters into an artsy, funky pedestrian walkway for Gulfport’s downtown entertainment district.

Fishbone Alley and Printer’s Alley are among several streets included in a New York Post travel story published Monday. The headline reads, “8 amazing American streets you’ve never heard of.”

Regarding Fishbone Alley, newyorkpost.com says, “On this unassuming backstreet, live blues music brings bold graffiti art to life.”

While many travelers use an Internet trip adviser to plan their trips, “...one of the best ways to explore a new place is to walk — to meander up and down a main drag, sleepy street or undiscovered back alley,” the Post said.

Fishbone Alley, between 13th and 14th streets, opened with rave reviews Oct. 2 in conjunction with Cruisin’ The Coast festivities in Gulfport. The alley is between 26th and 27th avenues.

Several restaurants and bars flank one side of the alley, which has reclaimed brick pavers circa 1906, and whimsical artwork including graffiti and murals. Strands of small overhead lights zigzag between buildings for a festive, open-air nighttime ambiance.

Fishbone Alley is a canyon alley, meaning it has no parking areas or empty lots. Parking is available throughout the downtown area, where there’s more than a dozen food and entertainment venues.

Before it opened, the City of Gulfport approved a “go cup” ordinance with legislative approval that allows people to stroll the entertainment district with a beverage of their choice.

The alley was renovated with a $250,000 from post-Hurricane Katrina streetscape money and $27,000 from the Knight Foundation to revitalize the area.

Robin Fitzgerald: 228-896-2307, @robincrimenews

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