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What people say about the Biloxi waterfront

Jim Swango, left, and his step-daughter Holly Fuller look at the damage to the Lighthouse-Porter Avenue Pier in Biloxi in September 2002 as the storm surge from Tropical Storm Isidore washes over it.
Jim Swango, left, and his step-daughter Holly Fuller look at the damage to the Lighthouse-Porter Avenue Pier in Biloxi in September 2002 as the storm surge from Tropical Storm Isidore washes over it. Sun Herald File

Dennis Burke, a resident of Seal Avenue said during a meeting about the La Quinta Hotel design there will never be single-family homes on the beach as prior generations knew it, but there should be expectations. “If we just let anything be built, that’s what we’re going to get,” he said. “If we raise the bar and say this is what we want our beach to look like, either they’ll build it to look like that or someone else will.” Add gabled roofs and a front porch and the hotel will fit right in, he said.

Wayne Hengen, a Biloxi attorney representing the La Quinta Hotel developers, said the hotel has worked with Biloxi for two years to make architectural changes the city requested. Biloxi’s architecture includes a “ship in a bottle” look at the Maritime & Seafood Industry Museum, a 60-foot guitar at Hard Rock Casino and what some people say looks like beer cans at the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art, which was designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry.

Walter “Buzzy” Bolton, a Biloxi architect and one of the authors of the waterfront plan: “If we don’t take advantage of it now it may be lost.”

Cono Caranna, spokesman for developers of Margaritaville Resort Biloxi: “We definitely like what we see.”

Sound Off comment: “I am not a resident of Biloxi, so maybe I should not have an opinion, but driving along the beach, I have noticed a lot of new buildings south of U.S. 90. To some people this is good, but to me, all I see is ugly buildings. Why clutter up our beachfront with tacky looking buildings?”

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