News

Gulfport rapper remembered with epilepsy walk

JEFF CLARK/SUN HERALD 
 The family of the late Gulfport rapper Lance 'Supa Villain' Carter remembers the musician during an epilepsy walk Saturdy at Harrison Central High School. Carter died from an epileptic seizure at age 28 in 2014.
JEFF CLARK/SUN HERALD The family of the late Gulfport rapper Lance 'Supa Villain' Carter remembers the musician during an epilepsy walk Saturdy at Harrison Central High School. Carter died from an epileptic seizure at age 28 in 2014.

LYMAN -- The late Gulfport rapper Lance "Supa Villain" Carter was memorialized Saturday with an epilepsy walk at Harrison Central High School.

Carter's mother, Barbara Carter, said the "Got Purp" walk was a way to raise awareness about epilepsy.

About 60 people participated.

"My son, Lance Carter, was a very well-liked music producer who went to Harrison Central," Barbara Carter said. "He died from epilepsy and we want people to have more knowledge about epilepsy."

She said her son was an adult when he had his first epileptic seizure. He lived with the disorder for three years but died in 2014.

"Lance was 28 when he died last year," she said. "He had his first seizure when he was 25. He was perfectly healthy before that. But then he started having seizures. He had a seizure so bad one time that he broke his shoulder."

Barbara Carter, a social worker, said the seizures started without any warning or symptoms.

"We want people to have more information about epilepsy," she said. "You don't really pay attention to something until it affects you."

According to the Epilepsy Foundation, epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that brings about unprovoked seizures. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy is the most common cause of death associated with the disorder."

Before his death, Lance Carter was well known in the hip-hop world as a rapper and a producer. He produced tracks for artists such as Yo Gotti.

"He had a studio at my house," Barbara Carter said of her son. "People loved him. He was a very kind and outgoing person and he was very talented."

Saturday's walk was also a way to bring some recognition to the Lance Michael Carter Foundation Musical Scholarship.

"He used to tell me, 'Mom, don't kill my dream,' and music was his dream," she said. "We want to be able to keep that dream alive. We will give a scholarship every year to a deserving Harrison Central student."

She said the scholarship will be awarded based on an original composition.

"We are asking the applicants to write an original piece and to work in some of Lance's music." she said.

  Comments