Coast Cooking

Crawfish can draw a crowd

Crawfish have been popular in France for generations, but bears little resemblance to what the Cajuns have done to this delicacy.
Crawfish have been popular in France for generations, but bears little resemblance to what the Cajuns have done to this delicacy. Special to the Sun Herald

Today is the last day of a week of blog posts about Mississippi tapas, or if you prefer, bar foods.

When they are in season, boiled, spicy crawfish are wildly popular and can be found in many bars and restaurants.

Check out what the Ole Biloxi Fillin’ Station is doing with crawfish on the weekend if you think mudbugs won’t draw a crowd.

If you must know, the French came up with the idea of quick-cooking seafood in a seasoned broth — what they call Court-bouillon (this is not the same recipe as red fish coubion, but has similar roots). It is pronounced coo-bee-on, and it is this idea we borrowed to spice up crawfish.

The mistake that most people make is to use only a commercial seasoning. The best I have ever had, although I have not seen them this year, come from the Lee market on Division Street in Biloxi.

Max Ly, the owner, used a variety of fresh ingredients, including jalapenos, citrus and a handful of spice. I sure wish Ly would give me the recipe, but it is a family secret.

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