Kaley Zacher poses for a portrait with her mother Kimberly, July 22 in Dublin, Ga. Zacher, gave permission for Kaley to be paddled twice at Southwest Laurents Elementary School, Ga. Although the use of corporal punishment in American schools has declined in recent decades, paddling is still on the books in 19 states, despite calls from the U.S. Education Department to curb punitive disciplinary measures, which has been shown to affect minority and disabled students disproportionately.
Kaley Zacher poses for a portrait with her mother Kimberly, July 22 in Dublin, Ga. Zacher, gave permission for Kaley to be paddled twice at Southwest Laurents Elementary School, Ga. Although the use of corporal punishment in American schools has declined in recent decades, paddling is still on the books in 19 states, despite calls from the U.S. Education Department to curb punitive disciplinary measures, which has been shown to affect minority and disabled students disproportionately. John Bazemore AP
Kaley Zacher poses for a portrait with her mother Kimberly, July 22 in Dublin, Ga. Zacher, gave permission for Kaley to be paddled twice at Southwest Laurents Elementary School, Ga. Although the use of corporal punishment in American schools has declined in recent decades, paddling is still on the books in 19 states, despite calls from the U.S. Education Department to curb punitive disciplinary measures, which has been shown to affect minority and disabled students disproportionately. John Bazemore AP