Throwing Shade

JUSTIN MITCHELL: Quit body shaming women who want to free the nipple

Miley Cyrus arrives at the 57th annual Grammy Awards at the Staples Center on Sunday, Feb. 8, 2015, in Los Angeles.
Miley Cyrus arrives at the 57th annual Grammy Awards at the Staples Center on Sunday, Feb. 8, 2015, in Los Angeles. Invision/AP

Miley Cyrus holds nothing back inside the pages of Marie Claire's September issue, speaking openly about sexual fluidity, gender, the male-dominated music industry and, most importantly, Taylor Swift's "Bad Blood" music video.

In a cover preview published by Marie Claire online, Cyrus somewhat criticizes Swift's girl-power video and hints that she thinks it's actually anti-feminist.

However, Swift's video isn't the important part of the conversation. Cyrus brings up a vital point about how America views sexuality and makes readers think about why it needs to be changed.

"I don't get the violence revenge thing. That's supposed to be a good example? And I'm a bad role model because I'm running around with my titties out? I'm not sure how titties are worse than guns," Cyrus said.

Sure, Cyrus is over-the-top. Her Instagram, which looks like a barely-legal Lisa Frank advertisement filled with neon color, skin and body glitter, strikes a chord with many who think Cyrus' behavior is too wild and her appearance is too sexy.

But the real issue is that women who want to show their body online are often discouraged, criticized or forbidden to do so.

Why are we so offended by a nipple? Why do we judge those who promote positive body image by labeling it inappropriate? Why are mothers on my Facebook newsfeed getting their photos reported of their babies breastfeeding?

I often wonder if the person who reports the photo of a mom providing her child nourishment ever reports photos of personal attacks, photos of bloody violence or the photos released of Ronda Rousey's ESPN cover.

Rousey, who demands respect and has brought the world of mixed martial arts inside of several homes in America, is a strong woman who celebrates her body, and in her ESPN cover, she proudly shows off her body -- but not too much skin. Heaven forbid a nipple show.

When will we stop censoring female empowerment for the sake of political correctness? #FreeTheNipple

  Comments