Throwing Shade

'Fifty Shades' of cold hard cash: Bondage, S&M sells in Mississippi

This combo made of book cover images provided by Vintage Books shows the "Fifty Shades of Grey" trilogy by best-selling author E L James.
This combo made of book cover images provided by Vintage Books shows the "Fifty Shades of Grey" trilogy by best-selling author E L James. ASSOCIATED PRESS

The "Fifty Shades of Grey' teddy bear, equipped with a mask and pair of tiny handcuffs, is retailing for $90. No, a whip and set of zip ties aren't included in your order.

From charm bracelets to box sets, the book-turned-movie about a timid girl agreeing to to a dominant/submissive relationship with a powerful executive has people from around the word hot and bothered and ready for the Valentine's Day film release.

Movie ticket website Fandango's predictions of pre-sale tickets in the Southern region was low, but Mississippi exceeded expectations, according to Entertainment Weekly.

Mississippi's pre-sale ticket purchases are nearly four times higher than predicted, Fandango reported, the biggest difference in the country.

'Fifty Shades' ticket pre-sale is also the largest R-rated move pre-sale in history, the article said.

As Mississippians line up at theaters next Saturday to see Christian Grey dominate Anastasia Steele, we should remember to extend the conversation of sexuality beyond the the big screen.

According to a Sun Herald report from 2012, 81 school districts in Mississippi chose to teach abstinence-only sex education inside their classrooms. 71 school districts opted to teach abstinence-plus education, which allows some forms of sex education to be implemented inside classrooms.

Fifty eight percent of high-school students reported having sex before reaching the end of their senior year of high school, according to Mississippi First report.

"Fifty Shades of Grey" is a perfect example of curiosity about sex and why the conversation regarding sexuality is prevalent and important.

It's clear that sex sells, so should we follow the less-talk-more-action approach when it comes to sex education?

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