Throwing Shade

A lesson about 'Bee-locks-see' from Jim Cantore that national media should learn

The Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore reported live when hurricanes Harvey and Irma came ashore earlier this year and now is on the Gulf Coast tracking Tropical Storm Nate.
The Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore reported live when hurricanes Harvey and Irma came ashore earlier this year and now is on the Gulf Coast tracking Tropical Storm Nate.

That place between New Orleans and Mobile? Do you know where I’m talking about?

It’s the place where Hurricane Nate made landfall early last year. The place where casinos saw flash flooding from storm surge. The place where Subtropical Storm Alberto may make landfall on Memorial Day. The place that was inundated in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina.

The place forgotten sometimes by the national media. And its cities are often mispronounced.

Spoiler alert: I’m talking about Mississippi, otherwise known as the Land Mass between Louisiana and Alabama.

It started again last year when an NBC News report allegedly left out Mississippi in its story.

But things got better when meteorologists and journalists from The Weather Channel honed in on our state, sharing videos of feeder bands rolling in and sticking with us for 24 hours as Nate rolled through. The eye of Nate made landfall in east Gulfport, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Mike Seidel was in Biloxi for the brunt of the storm and almost got wiped out by a chair. His reporting helped local journalists in newsrooms updating content for the web and let those with power be updated in real-time, just as the Sun Herald and other media outlets on the Coast were doing.

Jim Cantore made a pit stop in Gulfport before heading to Alabama to cover the storm, but he mentioned the Coast several times throughout the night and expressed concern for Pascagoula, which took the brunt of Nate’s storm surge.

And once it was clear that Mississippi would take a direct hit from Nate, journalists across the nation got the picture, and started reporting about what was going on in Bee-locks-see, Mississippi.

I’m sorry, where? Did you mean Biloxi?

Mike Seidel got it right. Jim Cantore got it right. Why couldn’t people in newsrooms in other places get it right?

Buh-luck-see. Say it with us, now.

But hey, I guess I should be happy the Land Mass finally got some proper coverage.

Mississippians stuck together and cleaned up the mess Nate left behind. And if Alberto rolls through and causes a ruckus, we'll bounce back quickly

We can only hope broadcast journalists from other places learn how pronounce the places we call home the next time a hurricane tears through the Gulf of Mexico. All of the places on the Coast, too.

Nate made landfall in Mississippi early on Sunday as a Category 1 hurricane and later weakened to a tropical storm. Thousands were without power in southern Mississippi., and, as seen in this video, the Golden Nugget casino's parking garage was on

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