In this Nov. 8, 2016, photo, a voter fills out his ballot at the Wilson School House in unincorporated Wilson, Idaho. Donald Trump’s victory came as a surprise to many Americans, the nation’s pollsters most of all. Heading into Election Day, most national surveys overstated what will likely be a narrow popular vote advantage for Hillary Clinton and led many to believe she was a shoo-in to win the Electoral College.
In this Nov. 8, 2016, photo, a voter fills out his ballot at the Wilson School House in unincorporated Wilson, Idaho. Donald Trump’s victory came as a surprise to many Americans, the nation’s pollsters most of all. Heading into Election Day, most national surveys overstated what will likely be a narrow popular vote advantage for Hillary Clinton and led many to believe she was a shoo-in to win the Electoral College. Otto Kitsinger AP
In this Nov. 8, 2016, photo, a voter fills out his ballot at the Wilson School House in unincorporated Wilson, Idaho. Donald Trump’s victory came as a surprise to many Americans, the nation’s pollsters most of all. Heading into Election Day, most national surveys overstated what will likely be a narrow popular vote advantage for Hillary Clinton and led many to believe she was a shoo-in to win the Electoral College. Otto Kitsinger AP

National Politics

November 11, 2016 3:32 PM

Discrepancy between electoral and popular vote draws scrutiny to voting system

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