A dead cypress tree is seen from the air in 2011 surrounded by muddy shallows as an example of shoreline erosion near Lake Salvador in Jefferson Parish, outside New Orleans. A new study suggests that, on average, the Louisiana coast is sinking at a rate of about 9 millimeters, or just over a third of an inch, per year — a faster rate than previous studies have suggested, according to the authors.
A dead cypress tree is seen from the air in 2011 surrounded by muddy shallows as an example of shoreline erosion near Lake Salvador in Jefferson Parish, outside New Orleans. A new study suggests that, on average, the Louisiana coast is sinking at a rate of about 9 millimeters, or just over a third of an inch, per year — a faster rate than previous studies have suggested, according to the authors. Gerald Herbert AP File
A dead cypress tree is seen from the air in 2011 surrounded by muddy shallows as an example of shoreline erosion near Lake Salvador in Jefferson Parish, outside New Orleans. A new study suggests that, on average, the Louisiana coast is sinking at a rate of about 9 millimeters, or just over a third of an inch, per year — a faster rate than previous studies have suggested, according to the authors. Gerald Herbert AP File

Scientists say the rapid sinking of Louisiana’s coast already counts as a ‘worst case scenario’

June 15, 2017 06:07 PM

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