More Videos

Listeria is rare but dangerous 0:33

Listeria is rare but dangerous

Sophia Myers was an angel among us 4:10

Sophia Myers was an angel among us

Southern Miss RB Tez Parks discusses his roller coaster game 3:09

Southern Miss RB Tez Parks discusses his roller coaster game

Superintendent cuts interview short when asked about pulling 'To Kill a Mockingbird' 1:32

Superintendent cuts interview short when asked about pulling 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

He left a big corporation to be his own boss. Now his business is taking off. 1:26

He left a big corporation to be his own boss. Now his business is taking off.

Bozo’s burglar falls on mopped floor, not once, not twice… 1:16

Bozo’s burglar falls on mopped floor, not once, not twice…

Sophia Myers comes home to a wonderland 2:11

Sophia Myers comes home to a wonderland

Sun Herald reporter Jeff Clark explains 'Why I Walk' 2:05

Sun Herald reporter Jeff Clark explains 'Why I Walk'

Banned books that shaped American literature 2:08

Banned books that shaped American literature

Catfish flutter on street as Nate floodwaters recede in Biloxi 0:25

Catfish flutter on street as Nate floodwaters recede in Biloxi

  • The fight for Bears Ears

    In late 2016, then-President Obama designated a 1.35 million acre swath of forest and red-rock canyons in southeast Utah as the Bears Ears National Monument. According to a White House statement, the monument was established “to protect some of our country’s most important cultural treasures, including abundant rock art, archeological sites, and lands considered sacred by Native American tribes.” It was a victory for local tribes and conservationists, but some Utah residents are wary of what they see as government overreach and are encouraging their state officials call on the Trump administration to rescind the monument status.

In late 2016, then-President Obama designated a 1.35 million acre swath of forest and red-rock canyons in southeast Utah as the Bears Ears National Monument. According to a White House statement, the monument was established “to protect some of our country’s most important cultural treasures, including abundant rock art, archeological sites, and lands considered sacred by Native American tribes.” It was a victory for local tribes and conservationists, but some Utah residents are wary of what they see as government overreach and are encouraging their state officials call on the Trump administration to rescind the monument status. Brittany Peterson McClatchy
In late 2016, then-President Obama designated a 1.35 million acre swath of forest and red-rock canyons in southeast Utah as the Bears Ears National Monument. According to a White House statement, the monument was established “to protect some of our country’s most important cultural treasures, including abundant rock art, archeological sites, and lands considered sacred by Native American tribes.” It was a victory for local tribes and conservationists, but some Utah residents are wary of what they see as government overreach and are encouraging their state officials call on the Trump administration to rescind the monument status. Brittany Peterson McClatchy

Native Americans prepare to battle Trump over Utah national monument

March 20, 2017 5:33 PM

More Videos

Listeria is rare but dangerous 0:33

Listeria is rare but dangerous

Sophia Myers was an angel among us 4:10

Sophia Myers was an angel among us

Southern Miss RB Tez Parks discusses his roller coaster game 3:09

Southern Miss RB Tez Parks discusses his roller coaster game

Superintendent cuts interview short when asked about pulling 'To Kill a Mockingbird' 1:32

Superintendent cuts interview short when asked about pulling 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

He left a big corporation to be his own boss. Now his business is taking off. 1:26

He left a big corporation to be his own boss. Now his business is taking off.

Bozo’s burglar falls on mopped floor, not once, not twice… 1:16

Bozo’s burglar falls on mopped floor, not once, not twice…

Sophia Myers comes home to a wonderland 2:11

Sophia Myers comes home to a wonderland

Sun Herald reporter Jeff Clark explains 'Why I Walk' 2:05

Sun Herald reporter Jeff Clark explains 'Why I Walk'

Banned books that shaped American literature 2:08

Banned books that shaped American literature

Catfish flutter on street as Nate floodwaters recede in Biloxi 0:25

Catfish flutter on street as Nate floodwaters recede in Biloxi

  • Talking about the Freedom to Marry - Out Here in Mississippi

    Out Here in America host Justin Mitchell talks about the importance of marriage equality and the need for open conversation in the south with gay rights activist Evan Wolfson and filmmaker Eddie Rosenstein.