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  • 61-year-old graduate: “I just want to keep learning”

    Thomas Loll, 20, his mother Esther Faye Clay-Arant, 37, and grandmother, Diane Robinson, 61, will graduate this week from college. Loll will get an associate’s degree from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College and Clay-Arant and Robinson with bachelor’s degrees from University of Southern Mississippi and William Carey University, respectively.

Thomas Loll, 20, his mother Esther Faye Clay-Arant, 37, and grandmother, Diane Robinson, 61, will graduate this week from college. Loll will get an associate’s degree from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College and Clay-Arant and Robinson with bachelor’s degrees from University of Southern Mississippi and William Carey University, respectively. John Fitzhugh jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com
Thomas Loll, 20, his mother Esther Faye Clay-Arant, 37, and grandmother, Diane Robinson, 61, will graduate this week from college. Loll will get an associate’s degree from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College and Clay-Arant and Robinson with bachelor’s degrees from University of Southern Mississippi and William Carey University, respectively. John Fitzhugh jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com

Education never gets old — Three generations earn college degrees this week

May 11, 2017 02:19 PM

UPDATED May 11, 2017 08:20 PM

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  • Gulfport teaching team wins national award for their project-based teaching style

    Gulfport High School teachers Patrick Wadsworth and Gerald "Dave" Huffman are one of the 10 finalists for the 2017 Harbor Freight Tools for Schools Prize for Teaching Excellence. As a finalist, the school and teachers received $30,000. Their students work collaboratively on projects that they choose, acquiring real-world experience in the process.