In this June 1, 2016 photo, a worker for MBS Equipment Co., a grip and lighting company, moves equipment in their warehouse at Second line Stages, in New Orleans. Louisiana’s once-booming film industry, branded as ‘Hollywood South,’ has gone from darling to Hollywood castoff. The industry is off by as much as 90 percent due to changes to the state’s film tax incentive program that have scared off movie makers
In this June 1, 2016 photo, a worker for MBS Equipment Co., a grip and lighting company, moves equipment in their warehouse at Second line Stages, in New Orleans. Louisiana’s once-booming film industry, branded as ‘Hollywood South,’ has gone from darling to Hollywood castoff. The industry is off by as much as 90 percent due to changes to the state’s film tax incentive program that have scared off movie makers Gerald Herbert AP
In this June 1, 2016 photo, a worker for MBS Equipment Co., a grip and lighting company, moves equipment in their warehouse at Second line Stages, in New Orleans. Louisiana’s once-booming film industry, branded as ‘Hollywood South,’ has gone from darling to Hollywood castoff. The industry is off by as much as 90 percent due to changes to the state’s film tax incentive program that have scared off movie makers Gerald Herbert AP

Darling no more: Hollywood flees Louisiana for sweeter taxes

July 04, 2016 4:48 PM

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