FILE - This April 26, 2017 file photo shows the Google mobile phone icon, in Philadelphia.  A revised gender pay lawsuit seeking class action status against Google faults the search giant’s practice of asking new hires about their prior salary, a practice now banned in California because it perpetuates existing biases against women. The suit also adds a fourth complainant to the original, a preschool teacher with a master’s degree, to the group of three women who say they were underpaid by Google compared to their male counterparts.
FILE - This April 26, 2017 file photo shows the Google mobile phone icon, in Philadelphia. A revised gender pay lawsuit seeking class action status against Google faults the search giant’s practice of asking new hires about their prior salary, a practice now banned in California because it perpetuates existing biases against women. The suit also adds a fourth complainant to the original, a preschool teacher with a master’s degree, to the group of three women who say they were underpaid by Google compared to their male counterparts. Matt Rourke, File AP Photo
FILE - This April 26, 2017 file photo shows the Google mobile phone icon, in Philadelphia. A revised gender pay lawsuit seeking class action status against Google faults the search giant’s practice of asking new hires about their prior salary, a practice now banned in California because it perpetuates existing biases against women. The suit also adds a fourth complainant to the original, a preschool teacher with a master’s degree, to the group of three women who say they were underpaid by Google compared to their male counterparts. Matt Rourke, File AP Photo

Revised suit faults Google for asking hires about prior pay

January 03, 2018 02:33 PM

More Videos

  • How much weed can you carry now that California has legalized marijuana? You might be surprised

    Proposition 64 establishes one ounce of marijuana, or 8 grams of cannabis concentrates, as the legal limit for recreational pot possession for adults over the age of 21. Here are examples of actual amounts of products someone could carry now that California voters approved the ballot measure on Tuesday, Nov. 8.