An anti-explosive rat reaches explosives during the second phase of its training at a police station in Bogota, Tuesday, July 24, 2007. The Colombian police force has been experimenting with training rodents to detect explosives in minefields. The process would take advantage of rat's acute sense of smell and low weight, which would allow them to find mines without activating them. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
An anti-explosive rat reaches explosives during the second phase of its training at a police station in Bogota, Tuesday, July 24, 2007. The Colombian police force has been experimenting with training rodents to detect explosives in minefields. The process would take advantage of rat's acute sense of smell and low weight, which would allow them to find mines without activating them. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara) Fernando Vergara ASSOCIATED PRESS
An anti-explosive rat reaches explosives during the second phase of its training at a police station in Bogota, Tuesday, July 24, 2007. The Colombian police force has been experimenting with training rodents to detect explosives in minefields. The process would take advantage of rat's acute sense of smell and low weight, which would allow them to find mines without activating them. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara) Fernando Vergara ASSOCIATED PRESS

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