In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, pedestrians walk by a slavery port marker in Portsmouth, N.H., identifying a port where slaves arrived or where ships were sent to be used in the trade. A project aimed at bringing the little-known history of some of Americaís most prolific slave-trade ports to the public is moving to its next target: Rhode Island, where some 1,000 slave-trading voyages were launched. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, pedestrians walk by a slavery port marker in Portsmouth, N.H., identifying a port where slaves arrived or where ships were sent to be used in the trade. A project aimed at bringing the little-known history of some of Americaís most prolific slave-trade ports to the public is moving to its next target: Rhode Island, where some 1,000 slave-trading voyages were launched. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Elise Amendola AP
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, pedestrians walk by a slavery port marker in Portsmouth, N.H., identifying a port where slaves arrived or where ships were sent to be used in the trade. A project aimed at bringing the little-known history of some of Americaís most prolific slave-trade ports to the public is moving to its next target: Rhode Island, where some 1,000 slave-trading voyages were launched. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Elise Amendola AP

Project aims to mark Biloxi as American slave trade port

January 28, 2016 2:55 PM

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