This administration building was the first Mississippi Centennial Exposition structure built in 1917 and was the last of the Expo buildings to be torn down in 1951 as then-owners of the property, the U.S. Veterans Administration, updated. Replacement buildings were in a similar Spanish Colonial Revival style and several of those were restored after Hurricane Katrina as Gulfport, now owners of the National Historic Landmark site, plans redevelopment.
This administration building was the first Mississippi Centennial Exposition structure built in 1917 and was the last of the Expo buildings to be torn down in 1951 as then-owners of the property, the U.S. Veterans Administration, updated. Replacement buildings were in a similar Spanish Colonial Revival style and several of those were restored after Hurricane Katrina as Gulfport, now owners of the National Historic Landmark site, plans redevelopment. From the Southern Possum Tales Collection
This administration building was the first Mississippi Centennial Exposition structure built in 1917 and was the last of the Expo buildings to be torn down in 1951 as then-owners of the property, the U.S. Veterans Administration, updated. Replacement buildings were in a similar Spanish Colonial Revival style and several of those were restored after Hurricane Katrina as Gulfport, now owners of the National Historic Landmark site, plans redevelopment. From the Southern Possum Tales Collection

100 years ago: War and a canceled Coast birthday party

January 15, 2017 12:00 AM

UPDATED March 08, 2017 12:15 PM

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