Settled into his comfortable chair in the television room of his Broomall, Pensylvania, home, Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist emeritus Bill Lyon is handed the TV remote by his wife of 52 years, Ethel, for a few hours of soap operas and game shows on May 17, 2016. Lyon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease three years ago and continues to lead an active life.
Settled into his comfortable chair in the television room of his Broomall, Pensylvania, home, Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist emeritus Bill Lyon is handed the TV remote by his wife of 52 years, Ethel, for a few hours of soap operas and game shows on May 17, 2016. Lyon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease three years ago and continues to lead an active life. Clem Murray TNS
Settled into his comfortable chair in the television room of his Broomall, Pensylvania, home, Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist emeritus Bill Lyon is handed the TV remote by his wife of 52 years, Ethel, for a few hours of soap operas and game shows on May 17, 2016. Lyon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease three years ago and continues to lead an active life. Clem Murray TNS

Alzheimer’s disease greatly affects many seniors

November 16, 2016 12:00 AM

UPDATED November 02, 2016 08:55 AM

More Videos

  • Southport Line wants to “elevate” the po-boy game in Biloxi

    Southport Line Poor Boys restaurant owner Curtis Schmitt has transformed an 1898 Creole cottage on Howard Avenue into his vision of what a New Orleans po-boy restaurant should be. They local-source as many ingredients as possible, and are known for their home-made pickles and mayonnaise.