A filing cabinet broken into in 1972 as part of the Watergate burglary, beside a computer server that Russian hackers breached during the 2016 presidential campaign, both now in the basement of the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington, Dec. 12, 2016. An investigation into the Russian operation reveals a series of missed signals, slow responses and a continuing underestimation of its seriousness.
A filing cabinet broken into in 1972 as part of the Watergate burglary, beside a computer server that Russian hackers breached during the 2016 presidential campaign, both now in the basement of the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington, Dec. 12, 2016. An investigation into the Russian operation reveals a series of missed signals, slow responses and a continuing underestimation of its seriousness. Justin T. Gellerson The New York Times
A filing cabinet broken into in 1972 as part of the Watergate burglary, beside a computer server that Russian hackers breached during the 2016 presidential campaign, both now in the basement of the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington, Dec. 12, 2016. An investigation into the Russian operation reveals a series of missed signals, slow responses and a continuing underestimation of its seriousness. Justin T. Gellerson The New York Times

How Russian cyberpower invaded the U.S. election

December 16, 2016 5:00 AM

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