AP News in Brief at 5:58 a.m. EDT

The Associated PressJuly 14, 2014 

Netanyahu says Israel will intensify Gaza campaign if Hamas rejects cease-fire

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warns Hamas that Israel will intensify its week-long campaign against Gaza militants if Hamas rejects an Egyptian-proposed cease-fire.

The truce was supposed to go into effect early on Tuesday morning but the Israeli military says 24 rockets have been fired at Israel from the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip since the expected start of the cease-fire.

Netanyahu says that "if Hamas rejects the Egyptian proposal and the rocket fire from Gaza does not cease, and that appears to be the case, we are prepared to continue and intensify our operation."

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

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AP Exclusive: As Kim vows to feed his hungry nation, North Korean farmers struggle to adapt

Rim Ok Hua looks out over her patch of farm just across the Tumen River from China, where rows of lush, green young potato plants stretch into the distance.

As North Korean farmers go, Rim is exceptionally lucky. The Changpyong Cooperative Farm where she works is mechanized, has 500 pigs to provide fertilizer and uses the best available seeds, originally brought in from Switzerland. In most fields throughout the country, farmers work the fields by hand, or behind bony oxen.

However, this year, even more than most, they are all under intense pressure to feed a hungry nation.

Leader Kim Jong Un has succeeded in establishing his country as a nuclear power, and even sent a satellite into orbit. Now, with prolonged international sanctions and largesse from former communist allies mostly gone, Kim is calling on farmers to win him another battle. In 2012, and again this year, he promised the nation it would never face famine again.

But can isolated and impoverished North Korea ever escape the ghosts of famines past?

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Legal marijuana delivery companies in Wash. and Colo. skirting the law, delivering highs

SEATTLE (AP) — William "Jackrabbit" Large pulls his SUV onto the side of a downtown Seattle street, parking behind an Amazon Fresh delivery truck and carrying a product the online retailer doesn't offer: marijuana.

The thin, bespectacled Large is a delivery man for Winterlife, a Seattle company that is among a group of new businesses pushing the limits of Washington state's recreational pot industry by offering to bring marijuana to almost any doorstep.

"It's an opportunity that should not be missed," Large says with the kind of fast-talking voice meant for radio.

While delivery services have existed for years to supply medical marijuana patients, the rise of similar businesses geared toward serving recreational users in Washington and Colorado highlights how the industry is outpacing the states' pot laws.

Winterlife's business model is a felony under Washington state law, which allows only the sale of pot grown by licensed producers at licensed retail shops.

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Subway train derails in Moscow, killing 10 people, injuring 106

MOSCOW (AP) — A rush-hour subway train derailed in Moscow Tuesday, killing 10 people and injuring at least 106, emergency officials said.

Several cars left the track in the tunnel after a power surge triggered an alarm, which caused the train to stop abruptly.

City Hall officials gave the death toll as 10. At least 106 people were hospitalized, of whom 50 are in grave condition, Itar-TASS said, quoting Moscow's health department chief, Georgy Golukhov.

An Associated Press journalist saw injured people taken out of the station on stretchers. At least 15 ambulances were standing by, while four helicopters took off from the lawn nearby.

Golukhov told Russian television that only one person is still trapped in a wrecked train car but he is alive. However, emergency services at the scene speculated that there could be more.

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Chairwoman Janet Yellen to deliver Federal Reserve report on monetary policy to Congress

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen will have some good news to tell Congress this week about the health of the labor market. But lawmakers will likely press her to provide more information on just how the central bank intends to react to the good news.

Yellen is scheduled to deliver the Fed's twice-a-year report to Congress on interest-rate policy and the economy. She testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday and will follow that with testimony Wednesday before the House Financial Services Committee.

She delivered her first monetary report to Congress in February, just a week after being sworn in to succeed Ben Bernanke as the first woman to head the central bank.

While unemployment stood at 6.7 percent in February, it has now fallen to 6.1 percent, the lowest point since September 2008, reflecting strong job growth in recent months. The economy has created an average of more than 200,000 jobs a month over the past five months, the strongest stretch since the late 1990s.

That will be the good news that Yellen will relate. But lawmakers are certain to quiz her about what the performance of the labor market will mean for the Fed's handling of interest rates in coming months.

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Archie's death saving a gay friend latest comic book story to inject reality

LOS ANGELES (AP) — For most of Archie Andrew's life, the red-headed comic book icon's biggest quandary was whether he liked Veronica or Betty.

The character's impending death comes in Wednesday's installment of "Life with Archie," a spin-off series that centers on grown-up renditions of Archie and his Riverdale pals. It brings a bold conclusion to Archie Comics' four-year-old modern makeover of the squeaky-clean, all-American character.

Freckle-faced Archie will meet his demise when he intervenes in an assassination attempt on senator Kevin Keller, Archie Comics' first openly gay character, who's pushing for more gun control in Riverdale. Archie's death, which was first announced in April, will mark the conclusion of the "Life with Archie" series.

"I think Archie Comics has taken a lot of risks in recent years, and this is the biggest risk they've taken yet," said Jonathan Merrifield, a longtime Archie fan who hosts the Riverdale Podcast about all things Archie. "If it shakes things up a little bit, and people end up checking it out and seeing what's going on in Archie Comics, it will be a risk that was smartly taken."

While casual fans likely still associate Archie with soda shops and sock hops — and that's still holds true for the very much alive teenage character in the original "Archie" series — Archie was thrust into adulthood with the launch of "Life with Archie" in 2010. The series kicked off after alternate futures were envisioned where the love-struck do-gooder married both Veronica and Betty.

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Unaccompanied minors enroll in US schools, presenting opportunities and extra costs

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — After 14 years of separation from her parents and a harrowing journey across the U.S. border, Milsa Martinez finds solace in the northern Virginia high school where she's perfecting her English and learning civics and math.

For children and teens crossing the border alone like Martinez did two years ago, America's schools are one of the few government institutions where they are guaranteed services, from science instruction to eye exams.

While their cases are being processed by immigration authorities, most of these minors are released to family members or sponsors who are told the children must be enrolled in school.

Schools and districts in metropolitan areas such as Washington, Houston and Miami have seen an uptick in the number of these students and anticipate more could enroll this fall. "They have their hearts in the right places, but it's a difficult task," said Randy Capps, director of research for U.S. programs at the Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan Washington think tank.

The government estimates that 90,000 children, primarily from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, could make the journey alone by this fall, and that as many as 145,000 of them could arrive next year. They often come to join a parent, many times escaping criminal gangs or extreme poverty.

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NY couple reunited with long-lost class ring — a token of their love found on a Greek island

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 40 years after a New York man last saw his high school class ring, the love token his wife had until their wedding night popped up on a Greek island.

How it got to Naxos after it disappeared with his bride's purse at their wedding reception is a mystery. But earlier this month, the ring arrived by mail on Staten Island.

"It doesn't fit me anymore," said Stan Ostapiak, a retired police officer. "But my wife will put it back on her key chain, so we can go steady again."

Ostapiak, 69, graduated from a Manhattan high school in 1962. About a decade later, his wife's clutch purse was stolen — with the ring inside — the night they were married.

Fast forward four decades: a young Greek man on the island of Naxos came across the ring in his late father's belongings, with the name of the now defunct Seward Park High School in New York engraved inside.

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Pistorius family says runner, free on bail during murder trial, is accosted at nightclub

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Oscar Pistorius recently visited a nightclub with a cousin and was accosted by a man who aggressively questioned him about his murder trial, his family said Tuesday.

An argument followed and the athlete, who is free on bail, soon left the club, said Anneliese Burgess, a spokeswoman for the Pistorius family. Pistorius had been seated in a quiet booth in the VIP section, she said in a statement.

"My client regrets the decision to go to a public space and thereby inviting unwelcome attention," Burgess said.

Pistorius was accosted by "an individual who has now been identified as a Mr. Mortimer," according to the statement. The Juice, a South African celebrity news website, said the man who argued with Pistorius is Jared Mortimer, and quoted him as saying that the Paralympic athlete started the confrontation.

The altercation happened Saturday night in Sandton, an upscale area in Johannesburg, according to South African media.

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Alzheimer's rates are dropping in the US and Germany but rising in poor nations, studies find

The rate of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias is falling in the United States and some other rich countries — good news about an epidemic that is still growing simply because more people are living to an old age, new studies show.

An American over age 60 today has a 44 percent lower chance of developing dementia than a similar-aged person did roughly 30 years ago, the longest study of these trends in the U.S. concluded.

Dementia rates also are down in Germany, a study there found.

"For an individual, the actual risk of dementia seems to have declined," probably due to more education and control of health factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure, said Dr. Kenneth Langa. He is a University of Michigan expert on aging who discussed the studies Tuesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Copenhagen.

The opposite is occurring in some poor countries that have lagged on education and health, where dementia seems to be rising.

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