McDaniel camp should take note of this tale of the expanding electorate

Posted on June 30, 2014 

Tucked in the middle of Stuart Stevens' first-person account of how Sen. Thad Cochran won the runoff against Chris McDaniel is a bit of information that McDaniel supporters should know. Cochran came in second to McDaniel in the June 3 primary. His strategists knew there were hundreds of thousands of voters who backed Cochran in 2008 but stayed home June 3. Their plan was simple: Get those people to the pulls on June 24.

Here's Stevens:

"We started with the most obvious task: ensuring that everyone who voted for Cochran on June 3 showed up again in three weeks. My partner, Austin Barbour, along with Josh Gregory from Jackson-based Frontier Strategies, put together a crash program to gather all the data from every county clerk of who had voted. It was time-consuming and expensive, but essential. Within 10 days, we had 95 percent of the data.

"To those names we added high-propensity Republican primary voters: those who had voted in other primaries but didn’t vote on June 3. Together we worked those two universes over and over with phone calls, mail, and door knocks. Our goal was to identify at least 100,000 known Cochran voters by the weekend before the June 24 election. We made it to 120,000."

 

McDaniel should note it took Cochran's team 10 days and a lot of money to gather voting data from every county. McDaniel wants to examine the election records from every county too. But he needs to gather data from the Primary and the Runoff as he tries to find enough illegal crossover votes to put the election results in doubt. Voters who voted in the Democratic Primary were barred by law from voting in the GOP runoff.

McDaniel isn't getting a lot of national backing (key to his campaign in the primary and runoff) and is raising money via email etc. And he's on Day 6 of his examination of the runoff vote.

But, hey, they said Cochran was a longshot in the runoff.

 

Find the rest of Stevens story at The Daily Beast.

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