Defending D in the Big Easy

Posted by GARY ESTWICK on September 10, 2012 

Interim coach Aaron Kromer spent part of Monday defending his defense. Whether he did as good of a job as his defense during Sunday's 40-32 embarrassment against the Washington Redskins is your opinion. But here's what Kromer had to say...

When asked his reaction to a network show saying the Saints defense looked more reactive than proactive like they had in years past, Kromer said it wasn't he scheme but the speed in which the defensive game plan was executed.

"As we were playing the scheme, were we that half a step behind sometimes?" he asked, setting up his own answer.

"Yes. Were they gaining some yards because of it? Yes."

Kromer went on to give a vote of confidence in first-year defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo.

 "The players trust in his scheme. They have practiced it and felt good about it. It is just a case of there’s some missed tackles, there are a couple missed executions that you have throughout the game and that is when they chunking the yards up against you."

Chunk is a word for it. 

And that's what bothers me about the Saints' defensive performance. The Redskins didn't really challenge them much downfield; as least not as much as other teams have, or will after watching this performance on tape. If the problems aren't fixed, they will get much worse. 

Rookie Robert Griffin III had a career day on his first day under center, completing 19 of 26 passes for 320 yards, including an 88-yard touchdown pass to Pierre Garcon to give Washington a lead it never relinquished. Griffin had to TD scores on the day.

Alfred Morris, Washington's running back, finished with 96 yards on 28 carries. He earned 75 of his yards in the second half as the Redskins held on to their lead.

And now, Cam Newton is next? Oh boy...

 

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